Social Butterfly Magazine Seasonably Social: Summer 2017

Seasonably Social: Summer 2017


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Social Butterfly Magazine Seasonably Social: Summer 2017Faith's *You're in-the-know* Info

Faith Bennett
Founder, Publisher, Editor


I think Summer is the most anticipated season.  Sure, Fall and Winter host the most festive holidays (Thank Goodness! - to get us through those long, cold nights!), and in Spring, we get a short break to celebrate renewal, but Summer means extended time - to just enjoy!

We made it through another school year! If you are a student, a parent, or a caregiver, you can almost feel the shift in energy when June arrives.  Warmer, more relaxed days are ahead.  A time to regroup for another cycle, come September.  Living in a college town, you feel it EXTRA STRENGTH.  But before the official start of summer, we must celebrate our Dads and Grads!  Both are BIG SHOES to fill.  Check out our Top Ten List of Motivational Quotes in their honor in Social Psychology.

For Social Soles, we interviewed three awesome guys. For June: Pittsburgh Dad, Curt Wooten for Father’s Day. And don’t forget the dads in your own life - Father’s Day is the 18th! For our July, Patriotic Issue: Dan Del Bianco, Executive Director of The Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix.  And John Valentine, Director of the PDCDC (Pittsburgh Downtown Community Development Corporation) for our August, Social Spaces Issue. Read their interviews, then check out video from our visits in our Behind the Scene at Social Butterfly Magazine and in Monday Montage on our YouTube channel. Search: Social Butterfly Magazine

Lots going on in the Burgh this summer. Check our Special Guides for exact dates, and check back often as they are updated and added to continually. Our top three Faves are:

1) The Three Rivers Arts Festival in June - Social Butterfly will be there with DIY ButterFlutter Photo Props, so stop by for a Photo Op! The 16th is Flip Flop Day, The 27th is Sunglasses Day – Yep! Sounds like Summer to me – The 21st to be exact: First Day of Summer!  Share with us on social how you are enjoying: The 29th is Camera Day!

2) The Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix in July.  The 14 th is Collector Car Appreciation Day, and before that - The 1st marks Second Half of the Year Day (we are half way through 2017 – Can you believe?), The 4th is Independence Day, and the entire month hosts Social Wellness Month – just some of the good reasons to get out and about!

3) The Three Rivers Regatta in August. Look for Social Butterfly fluttering around the Point.  The whole month is dedicated to gearing back up for September.  August hosts Back to School Month and Exercise with Your Child Week the 6-12.  Lots of pet holidays too after DOGust is celebrated on the 1st. Check out our Special Social Calendars for more fun!

This year Pgh Fashion Week Downtown will be back again, and on September 23 - we are happy to be presenting a Junior Runway Show as the Finale’ at CAPA in the Cultural District.  We will be updating you throughout the summer, so don’t miss a thing. We are super excited.  There will be a Pre Party, Pop Up Boutiques to Shop, After Party, and lots more…  June 13th is Sewing Machine Day, and I’m sure there will be lots of action in preparation for September!

Sit Down and Enjoy the Show here, and to Stay In-the-Know while On-the-Go, get your Social Butterfly Magazine Social Calendar & Portable Planner… June is Social Networking Month - See our website for more, including our Extensive Social Calendar of Events for what to do/where to go, Social Seen Photo Vault, and digital copies of our publications.  Watch Behind the Scene at Social Butterfly Magazine and Monday Montage on YouTube to see the fun Out-and-About in the Burgh! Check out our Merch each month for new additions.  Social with us daily across platforms for Contests and so you don’t miss a thing…

To (y)our Summer - being the refresher we all need…

Faith


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The Skin Center Express @Dallas Beauty Lounge


Dallas Beauy LoungeThe Skin Center Express @Dallas Beauty Lounge

609 Washington Pike #13
Bridgeville, PA 150173

www.dallasbeautylounge.com

The Skin Center Express @Dallas Beauty Lounge

If you’re looking for a full-service salon that also has a sweet spa and actual thrones to complete your royal treatment…

You’re gonna need some awesome friends who are already visiting Dallas Sauers and her staff at Dallas Beauty Lounge in Bridgeville and can refer you - because that waiting list is long

Dallas, barely halfway through her 20s and a Bridgeville native, was an advertising and PR student at Point Park when the nail salon she ran in her dining room exploded. Booked solid and having to choose her passion or her books, she dropped the latter and hired her first employee to keep up with demand.  Smart decision!

That demand hasn’t let up since.

In fact, Dallas Beauty Lounge is adding more – The Skin Center is opening an express center in the DBL spa that will be staffed four times a month to start, offering Botox and fillers. And Dallas? She’s “super excited” about the new relationship with her clients and mentors at TSC and there’s “no other business we should partner with.”

Dallas is confident and savvy and we loved getting to talk to her about how she got started – and how she’s moving forward!

The Skin Center Express @Dallas Beauty LoungeSocial Butterfly Magazine: How did you get started in nail art? How did this all start?

Dallas: I have a really odd start. When I was 14, my dad lost his business. We kind of lost everything – his building, his work cars, trucks. Everything. We were kind of sh*! out of luck on our college funds. In my young, independent woman stage, I was trying to figure out how to provide for the family. I got a job at the closest place I could walk from home – an Asian nail salon. I worked there from the time I was 14 until I was 21. I got really good at it.

When I was 18, I got my license and I had plenty of clients from there.

I’ve always been artistic, my mom is very artistic. My dad is very business-savvy, so I got the best of both worlds.

SBM: What made you want to jump in and do your own thing?

Dallas: I was at a pivotal point. I was so booked where I had to step back from doing it and just finish school – totally stop doing nails – or just continue.

I quit school and then I got an employee. I couldn’t do the work myself – I worked 12 hours a day, Monday through Saturday. I couldn’t keep up with it myself. She grabbed me on my Craigslist ad and was super nice; she worked with me for about two years and then we were so busy we were bursting out of my dining room. It really was a licensed salon, I worked with my municipality to have it zoned as a business.

I’m a really good saver. I opened my salon with no debt.

I really just felt like there was nothing I could do that I was as good at or as passionate at. I worked for other people my whole life and hated it. I’m more creative than corporate and it wasn’t something I was going to be good at.

SBM: You went from working out of your house to having a growing space with that’s booked solid with a massive waiting list – how are you feeling?

Dallas: It’s funny because I never thought that I would be as young as I am and so successful. I’m very lucky but at the same time, I’ve always considered luck to be the perfect marriage of being prepared for an opportunity and ready to take it. It’s meeting in the middle. You prep for what if this happens, what if this big break comes, am I ready to take it? I was willing to risk it.

My staff is amazing – without them this wouldn’t be possible. I have a great staff. Even my staff who are older than me see me as a mentor and that makes me feel great because I know that can be weird when your boss is younger than you. Everyone’s really funny and they’re like sisters. At the end of the day everyone loves each other. I have their best interests at heart and they know that.

Everyone’s super nice and fun. It’s the best. I’m surprised we have a salon like this because most salons are kind of cliquey, but nobody cliques here. I can put my energy into important things like running the business and my clients.

The Skin Center Express @Dallas Beauty Lounge
The Skin Center Express @Dallas Beauty Lounge
The Skin Center Express @Dallas Beauty Lounge
The Skin Center Express @Dallas Beauty Lounge

SBM: The Skin Center is moving in with DBL and opening an express center – how did that happen and what’s the response been?

Dallas: One of the daughters of The Skin Center owners came to my house to get her nails done years ago. She was in high school at the time and her dad would come in during the appointment. He’d say, “you’re gonna be so big some day, Dallas.” I’ve always had a great relationship with him. He’s been the marketing person behind everything at The Skin Center. I started with them as an ambassador because I use their services and I have this huge social media following. I have this commercial with them. The response was really huge.

I think a lot of people trust me and I’m very real about things. If I think Botox hurts, I’m going to tell you, but I also really like it.

SBM: That’s so exciting! What can we expect from the partnership moving forward?

Dallas: I’m hoping that they can add more of a full-time schedule here once we see how it works out. Right now Melanie & Kathy work at other locations, but we hope that what comes is more services – laser hair removal, microdermabrasion, things they offer at the med spa. As long as there’s a demand, we’re willing to do it.

SBM: You were 21 when this all started – what has been the biggest thing you’ve learned and what advice do you have for others looking for their “thing”?

Dallas: The two things I will say for any entrepreneur – having employees is going to be the toughest part of your job in making sure everything clicks.

And make yourself present. Too many times, I feel other salons are copying what we do. It’s totally okay – if you think that what we’re doing works, by all means, copy us. At the same time, it’s important to be a trailblazer. I think people like to come to us because we know our stuff, our salon is trendy. Even stuff like having champagne and wine and different spa waters – if you have something different, you’ll be successful.



Arsenal Ciderhouse & Wine CellarArsenal Ciderhouse & Wine Cellar

Trax Farms
528 Trax Rd
Finleyville, PA 15332

www.arsenalciderhouse.com

Arsenal Ciderhouse & Wine Cellar

Fruit & Farms go together so it makes sense that Arsenal Cider House paired up with Trax Farms for a brand new location to get Daily Rations.  Welcome to Finleyville! Arsenal Cider House and Wine Cellar is a U.S. Civil War thematic winery specializing in small batch, hand crafted hard apple cider, "cider style" fruit/grape wines, & mead. Arsenal’s new location at Trax Farms is closed Mondays & Tuesdays, but they’re open Wednesday – Friday from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m., on Saturday from noon to 8 p.m. and on Sunday from noon to 6 p.m.!

Why Daily Rations? According to Arsenal, it’s because “In the early days of the Federal Allegheny Arsenal, troops were given three 4 ounce rations of whiskey every day.  This was well and fine until they started tripping over themselves. You see, the soldiers figured they could save up the rations and drink them all at once….this caused problems. Lt. Col. Abram Wooley, who was in charge at that time, felt the need to force the troops to drink their whiskey when given. Aresnal’s growlers are named “Daily Rations” to commemorate this series of events in local history.”

Whirl One Studio


One Whirl StudioOne Whirl Studio

5314 Butler St.
Pittsburgh, PA 15201

onewhirlstudio.com

One Whirl StudioONE WHIRL Healthy Lifestyle Studio and Conversation Salon is a community-based integrative space with a focus on bringing ground-breaking information on how to live a healthy lifestyle.  The studio offers regular yoga and meditation classes, as well as workshops on gardening, specialty yoga, chakras, foraging, and feng shui. The Upper Lawrenceville space includes a yoga room, meditation room, and courtyard garden, all designed along feng shui and other ancient knowledge principles. The courtyard is an educational showcase for urban container farming, and features a full spectrum of vegetables, herbs, fruits, and naturalized flowers. ONE WHIRL Studio can be rented for meetings and private parties. The Studio will also carry specialty healthy lifestyle products with educational workshops, such as ONE WHIRL yoga leggings and apparel, DoTerra Essential Oils, EVER natural botanical skin care, and Renee Piatt exclusive jewelry designs. Stop in – welcome, and check out ONE WHIRL Healthy Lifestyle Studio!

Talia


TaliaTalia Cucina & Rosticceria

425 Sixth Ave.
Pittsburgh, PA

www.taliapgh.com

TaliaWelcome, Talia - a new restaurant located in the Alcoa Building, Downtown.  We love rustic Italian, and to be honest we were interested in seeing the space and art work.  When Muralist Jeremy Raymer told us that he was commissioned by owner Julian Vallozzi to recreate a 2 x larger version of a piece called Bird Girl for his restaurant, that we commissioned last August to be presented as a special Christmas Gift, Social Sister, Savannah was THRILLED!  Bringing a piece of that gorgeous southern town, and a little movie and novel trivia to the Burgh, is a good conversation piece to go along with the good eats, which include rotisserie meats, pastas, pizzas, seafood, and more. The bar also offers interesting choice. Hungry and Curious guests can get up close and personal with the chef at his counter that seats 10.  There is a lighter menu for lunch which includes paninis.  We admire the taste of this place!

 

Wigle Whiskey


Wigle WhiskeyWigle Whiskey

530 William Penn Place
Pittsburgh, PA 15219

www.wiglewhiskey.com

Wigle Whiskey

We’ve celebrated with them before, so we were excited to congratulate The Wigle Whiskey family as it continues to grow. We welcomed their new Tasting Room & Bottle Shop at the Omni William Penn Hotel to our Social Circle during a press preview event before their public grand opening on April 21! The newest location offers whiskey flights, house cocktails, absinthe drips, and their headliner – build your own old fashioneds. Just fill out a menu to choose your ingredients and get a tray in return filled with the fixings of your cocktail. You can also get drafts of local beers from Spoonwood Brewing Co., Penn Brewery, & East End Brewing Co.!

Couch Brewery


Couch BreweryCouch Brewery

1351 Washington Blvd.
Pittsburgh, PA 15206

www.couchbrewery.com

Couch Brewery

Welcome Couch Brewery to Washington Blvd! The brews themselves – crafted by Cary Shaffer, Darren Gailey, & Mike Pearrow – are even named after the comfy furniture with names like Recliner, Plush, Loveseat, & Ottoman Empire. The space is full of couches, TVs, vintage music, and board games and screams “hang out here!” The brewery is currently open Thursday – Saturday with food trucks each day.

Pittsburgh Tortas


Pittsburgh TortasPittsburgh Tortas

Pittsburgh, PA
304-914-1243

www.pittsburghtortas.com

Keep an eye out – Pittsburgh Tortas is one of Pittsburgh newest food trucks and it could be stopping at a location near you!  What’s a torta? It’s delicious Mexican street food that’s a sandwich made with a crusty bread roll and served hot or cold. Eric Andrejeski & Mike Oliver – the co-owners of Pittsburgh Tortas - use local bread, pickle their own onions, and serve it all up fresh! Check out pghtortas & pittsburghtortas.com to see where they’ll be next!


socialsoles_headingInterviewed by Kiley Fischer
with Introduction by Faith Bennett

Curt Wootton AKA Pittsburgh Dad

Curt Wootton - Pittsburgh DadThe Social Soles interview series is based on the saying, “You don’t really know someone until you have walked in his shoes.” We thought it would be interesting to begin each interview asking our guest to bring a pair of shoes that are significant to him. They can be the little ones he wore as a toddler in the ‘Burgh (parents used to bronze them things!); Those he was wearing when he found out Hills was closing for good; The pair he had on when his series premiered on October 25, 2011, or the set he was wearing just one year later, same day, when Pittsburgh’s Mayor Ravenstahl declared the 25th: Pittsburgh Dad Day; The kicks he was sportin’ when Eat n Park debuted the Pittsburgh Dad Smiley Cookie; A pair we would have never guessed...What shoes will he bring?

We associate shoes with memories: good and bad. The question steers the path of the conversation. This route will show us a side not always seen in the one we are talking with. A more personal side. We are excited to see in which direction we are lead – by the choice in footwear and the memories stirred. Come. Let’s take a walk on the Dad Side…

Pretty much everywhere, but even more so when you live in a college town, June means “Dads and Grads”. Dads won over Grads when we flipped the coin.  You know how these kids are these days, anyways.  What are they callin’ em?  Millennials or MillAnimals?  This month is our first full month of summer and parents are feeling the anxiety of knowing they will have to:  Keep them kids busy!  Even the word “busy” is “bus” with an extra letter!  Once the bus stops for the summer, things get more complicated! Too bad Kennywood didn’t step up and offer child care!  ANYways, it’s the season to celebrate DAD, and look forward to fireworks, the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix, the Three Rivers Arts Festival, the Three Rivers Regatta, and Potato Patch Fries - before the kids head back to homework and finding new reasons to complain… So, let’s get this done.

Social Butterfly Magazine: We can’t wait to hear about your shoes. What can you tell us about them?

Curt Wootton: I live for tennis shoes – but when they wear out, they are gone. My dad was always into throwing things away and no clutter – he was really a minimalist in that sense. So now when my shoes wear out – pffft – they’re gone, and then I get new shoes! (He gives us a big smile and laughs.) I have dress shoes I’ve had for years, but usually if I’m wearing dress shoes, it’s an, “ugh, it’s an uppity snobby fest and I’m not going to have any fun.” Tennis shoes are my go-to.

I had my Pittsburgh Dad shoes, the original shoes we had for the show, but I think I threw them away in the move. I wore them for four years and they were always the shoes I used for anything Pittsburgh Dad. They were falling apart; the soles were completely gone off the bottoms.

SBM: But you know, it totally fits the vibe.

Curt: If you go to my parents’ house, my dad has about four pairs of shoes while my mom has probably a million. He’ll go, “What are all these shoes in here? I have four pairs and that’s all you need! I got my boots, my tennis shoes, my flip flops, and my dress shoes! That’s all ya need!” I’m a lot like that.

SBM: (Laughs.) It really is passed down the generations.

Curt: Oh, yeah. When I was younger, I said, “I’m never gonna be like my dad.” But the older I get, the more I become him. I’m slowly transitioning.

Doing the show hasn’t helped at all. It’s really (he laughs), it’s really made it more certain.

Curt Wootton - Pittsburgh DadSBM: The show really is just a homage to your dad.

Curt: My dad and my mom’s dad. The voice comes more from my grandfather, boy did he complain about everything. He’d yell at us about everything. And then my dad – they’re all cut from the same cloth. My dad was born in Bloomfield and it’s just the way he is. If there’s something to complain and moan about, he will find it. Every time I talk to my dad – whenever you call my dad, be prepared for 20 minutes of complaining about something. Just buckle in.

They put a red light in at his house over in New Stanton and there was 20 minutes of that the other day. “I don’t understand why they do what they do! It’s just caused all sorts- “and it’s hysterical. Most of the times if I just go over there I’ll find a nugget of funniness to implement in our show. The early episodes, it wasn’t even me writing, it was just documenting what my dad had said over the years. There were no jokes – now we’re more jokey – but initially it was just verbatim how Chris grew up and how I grew up. For some reason people laughed at it.

SBM: It’s so funny because I remember being in college and my friend shared the show with me. I sent it to my mom and she immediately called and just said in this hushed voice, “It’s like they’re watching me.”

Curt: I had no idea that everyone else was the same, especially with catching on with the Steelers. That’s always been our bread and butter. People are always like, “Did you – did you have a camera in on me watching the game the other day?” It’s all the same reactions! That’s why Pittsburgh is such an awesome community and great city. People are bound to it. If they’re away, they want to come back to it. I always say we’re our own little culty-type city and it’s amazing to be a part of it. If you’re not from here, you can learn, but you get sucked in and you’re here for life.

SBM: I feel like we end up talking about that with a lot of people, the way Pittsburgh is like its own really weird, huge, dysfunctional family.

Curt: It is! I lived in Los Angeles for eight years to try to make it as an actor and any time I saw anyone with a Steelers, Pirates, Pittsburgh shirt on, I’d immediately gravitate to them. I’d strike up a conversation and that’s how I met most of my friends out there. I used to watch games at this Steelers bar, I met a lot of people there. If you want to network and you’re away from Pittsburgh, find some Pittsburgh people. They’ll take you in. It’s a happy, big family and I’m glad to be a part of it.

SBM: You spent all that time in LA, what’s a thing that outsiders really don’t get about this city?

Curt: It’s a very prideful city, hardworking. There’s a sense of community that I think doesn’t exist in say Los Angeles. It’s a big city, but it’s not. If you’re from Upper St. Clair, you’ll know someone from Baldwin. It’s not as big as maybe the world perceives it. If you look at Philly, that’s a huge city. Pittsburgh’s not small by any means, but it’s so much more family oriented and small in that sense. We have our traditions and it keeps us all together. It’s amazing. Anywhere you go, you’ll find someone from Pittsburgh. They’ll recognize the way you say a certain word and they’ll go, “Ah! Did I just here a ‘dahn?’” and it’s just the greatest city in America, I’m convinced.

SBM: I worked in Erie for a while and I always got that. I’d ask if somebody was going to watch the “Stillers” game and they’d look and me and say, “I’m – I’m sorry, what? You’re saying that, that’s not…that’s not how you say that…”

Curt: Oh my gosh, with the Steelers. My wife had me go to a wedding in January and there was a chance that the Steelers could play on Saturday. I’m going, “What kind of person?” I’m swearing. “You check the schedule before you even say, ‘Hey, I might get married on this day!’ There could be a Steelers playoff game!” I was spazzing. I said, “If they play on Saturday, I’m not going. I can’t go. I gotta watch – you think I’m gonna go and try to eat and the game’s on – there’s no way!” I was flipping.

We’re diehards. Steelers fans…and Pens fans and Pirates fans. We love our black and gold. I love it. It was a big thing for us. She couldn’t believe and I’m saying, “I don’t do a wedding in January on the weekend! That’s prime playoff season for the Steelers! Who doesn’t know that?! Who doesn’t check!? Just have it on the Super Bowl next!” Luckily they played on Sunday and crisis averted.

You gotta prepare! They take precedence. People say, “Well it’s Christmas.” Well we’re not eating dinner until the game is over! Pfft! This isn’t even up for debate. The game is on Christmas, I’m not talking to anyone during the game. Don’t have people over and have the kids opening presents because I don’t really care, I’m watching the game. I love it.

SBM: (Still laughing) We were kind of talking about your dad earlier, what was it like for you growing up with that quintessential Pittsburgh Dad? Curt: I always say when I was really little, he was very intimidating. He was a thicker, bigger dude, a weight lifter. He was just intimidating. He didn’t take any crap. When he said something, he’d yell at you, you’d do it, you’d listen to him. When I got to be a teenager especially, he’d start saying something and my sister and I would just laugh. We’re like, “Do you realize what you’re saying? It’s hysterical.” One time, he was flipping out because the cat that we had tore open the trash bag. He goes off: “I can’t believe this cat! The cat thinks it owns the house! I might as well sign the house over to the cat!” I said, “Do you hear yourself right now?!” He’d been doing that our whole life. When I was older, I said, “I gotta start writing this down, this is classic dadisms right here.” He would just yell. He yelled at everything. You got used to it and then it just became comedy. SBM: (still laughing) Curt: That’s how that went down. He still yells. He yells at everything. If you go to his house, you’ll hear him. He’ll yell at my mom for something…like the other day, she pulled the drawer out of the stove too far and he says, “I don’t understand why you had to do that! Who builds something that-“ Just go over to the house, you’ll see in five minutes where it all came from. SBM: Even – you think they’re gonna be stereotype videos – like the parking chairs but no, it’s all so true. Curt: It’s the way it is. Everyone’s cut from that Yinzer cloth. I don’t know who started it but it spread like wildfire somewhere in about the mid-50s. They started making that guy and they still make him. Everyone has a little bit of Pittsburgh Dad in them, everyone. Doesn’t matter if you’re man, woman, whatever. If you’re from around here, you got a part of Pittsburgh Dad in you. SBM: What kind of reactions do you get? Obviously pretty much everybody here goes nuts, but what kind of reactions do you get from outside? Curt: We have fans from all over the world. This year we really focused on the Steelers and decided we were going to do a video every week. We have fans who are Bengals fans, Ravens fans, Cowboys fans who say, “I hate the Steelers, but I love your show.” The more we keep doing it and growing it, the more it gets to a bigger fanbase. For a while, we were really just regional, but recently we’ve been branching out. We hope to continue to make it grow. SBM: I’m curious: If the Dad shoes that you lost in the move could talk, what would they say and what stories would they tell? Curt: I wore them for so many episodes. Sometimes we’d film the Zoo episode or Kennywood and there’d be a lot of anxiety because when I’m around a big crowd and filming, I get tense. There’s a lot of laughs in them, a lot of tension in them. The soles fell off, that’s how much we used them, and I threw them away like an idiot. They served us well for a long time. I wish I had them. SBM: You’re talking about Kennywood, and that whole thing with Noah’s Ark and bringing back the whale was hilarious. What were some of the coolest things that you’ve gotten to do with the show itself? Curt: That was really cool, getting to dedicate Noah’s Ark. We had been talking about the whale being gone – Chris and I talked about that since it’s been gone I think. SBM: I’ve been complaining about that for a long time. Curt: Oh man. They announced that it was coming back and to get to dedicate it was awesome. I got to write that little tribute to Noah’s Ark and the strangest thing was being in the back of Noah’s Ark by myself and it’s shaking and going back and forth and I’m like, “I’m getting really sick.” As a kid, I could probably sit in that thing for hours, but I’m in the back getting sick and I can’t hear because all of the animals are going (makes animal noises) and the ride’s going (makes a whining horn sound) and I’m trying to hear the cue. Eventually I just didn’t hear it and so I kind of crawled out and they’re all just waiting for me for about a minute and a half. I’m like, “OKAY!” That was really cool to do that. Anytime we get to go to Steelers. That organization just treats you like family, such class acts up there with Mr. Rooney and General Manager Kevin Colbert and Mike Tomlin. The players are really cool. That’s always a blast because I get to take my dad up there and he has a great time – he complains a lot to the general manger. Kevin’s really cool, he’s a Pittsburgh guy. I’m like, “Dad, he doesn’t – don’t start,” and he’s going “I don’t know why you let some of these guys on the team!” I wish I could just film it. Kevin just laughs. They kind of grew up in the same way, so they have a lot in common. Getting to go to different parts of Pittsburgh and put a little humor on every part of the town. It’s really cool. We love it and we don’t plan on stopping anytime soon. SBM: I feel like that’s not something you have to worry about. Curt: Chris and I, every week we’re down here after the game filming and we’re just cracking up. We have to stop forever because we think it’s funny and then that line doesn’t get any laughs in the show. We have a good time. SBM: I still just think it is the coolest tribute to your dad. Curt: I’d love to get him on an episode once, but he just kind of freezes up whenever you put him on camera. SBM: That’s when you just pull in the secret camera idea and go for it. Curt: I know. I really should. I wish I could, but he really swears so it would all be beeped. I would love to set up a camera and watch the game with him. “WHY the hell would you run a tackle on that play? That’s the stupidest call I’ve ever seen! If you lose the game, you’ll know why!” Nothing beat when I was a kid – I was probably 15 or 16 – and we lost Super Bowl XXX. He spazzed. He was up at the TV screaming at it. He’s storming around. I didn’t get that into it then because I was still learning how to get really into it. It was hysterical, the level of anger. There’s times when I’ve gotten yelled at, but him yelling then will always stick out when he yelled the loudest. SBM: It's so funny because I was talking to my dad last night and I said to him that I think the two times I remember of him really yelling when I didn't do something stupid were Super Bowl XXX where the dog's hiding in the shower - Curt: (He laughs) Oh yeah. The dogs would always hide. SBM: The dog's hiding, my dad's screaming, my mom's yelling at him for yelling...and then when Hills went out. That was the other time my dad lost his mind. Curt: Stuff like that bothers my dad, too. My mom can't stand watching games with us. If I go over...My mom likes watching the games, but then we get too into it. She'll go, "I can't watch this with you guys. You ruin everything. Why are you screaming? I'm just gonna leave." Then she goes to Target. "You guys make me so nervous. Why can't you just sit down and watch the game?" I'll be behind the couch and then I'll start clapping. She says it's too tense for her. I don't know how you can sit in tense situations! I pace back and forth, I lay down, I hide under things. It's crazy. SBM: I'm really excited for the hidden camera video now. Curt: He'll just be sitting there with his beer, yelling. He'll just recline and scream. Then he complains about everything else going on. They'll show the coaches on the sideline, or they'll show the other fans - he hates that. He's like, "Look at those idiots! Who would dress like that?" Meanwhile they'll show someone from Pittsburgh in a skull mask and he's like, "Look at that guy! That's great!" SBM: Your shoes have had a blast over the years. If you could walk in someone else's, whose would they be? Curt: I'd walk in my mom's shoes to understand how she put up with my dad all these years. I don't know how she does. She just looks at me and says, "I can't...I can't deal with your father anymore." The older he gets, the more Old Man Pittsburgh Dad he gets. She's a very patient woman and to walk in her shoes...My dad and I are not patient. She's saint-like. I'd say my dad's shoes...but we had a cat that tended to throw up in his shoes. SBM: (Laughs) Curt: True story! All the shoes would be lined up - don't leave them on the steps because if he trips on them in the morning, he'd throw them outside. He had a couple pairs of shoes, I had two, my sister had two or three, and the cat would always puke in his. (He laughs.) SBM: Well and I feel like in a way, you're already walking in your dad's shoes. Curt: I am! I'm slowly transitioning. My wife will tell you - she says, "You're just more like your dad all the time," and I am. With the heat? She'll start, "Can we -" and I'm like, "It's 65! That's plenty!" "But 70?" "70?! Don't ask to go on vacation then. We're not going on vacation with running it at 70. No Valentine's presents, how's that?" I never thought I'd be like that. (He laughs.) SBM: What's been the most rewarding thing for you on this whole crazy ride? Curt: Getting to laugh with the city and the people who call the city home. It's crazy that we all have the same memories and we can all relate to the same situations and stories whether it's the pool in the summer or trick or treating in this area or Christmas and New Year's traditions. It's all the same! Slamming the screen door, wasting paper towels - which I didn't realize you could waste paper towels. My dad'd be like, "What are you doing?" "I-probably the wrong thing." It's funny - parents in other cities get together to brag about the achievements of their children. "Oh, my child's on the honor roll" or "My child is the best in their little league." Our parents would all get together and try to top each other on the dumbass things us kids were doing. "Ah, the other day, my kid's painting and he doesn't set anything down there and it leaks down under and stains the table!" "Well I got that beat. The kid came in with mud all over his shoes and walked up the steps!" I remember! It's not accolades. But that's it - We're all part of that same family. That's really cool, reading what people post and getting emails saying they were down and it made them laugh or soldier overseas from Pittsburgh saying that's helped them keep a piece of Pittsburgh and laugh in some of the most hostile conditions. That's really cool and I'm really happy about that kind of stuff. From the man behind the Dad to the Dad himself – it wouldn’t be a Pittsburgh Father’s Day without chatting with Pittsburgh Dad, too!
SBM: (Still laughing) We were kind of talking about your dad earlier, what was it like for you growing up with that quintessential Pittsburgh Dad? Curt: I always say when I was really little, he was very intimidating. He was a thicker, bigger dude, a weight lifter. He was just intimidating. He didn’t take any crap. When he said something, he’d yell at you, you’d do it, you’d listen to him. When I got to be a teenager especially, he’d start saying something and my sister and I would just laugh. We’re like, “Do you realize what you’re saying? It’s hysterical.” One time, he was flipping out because the cat that we had tore open the trash bag. He goes off: “I can’t believe this cat! The cat thinks it owns the house! I might as well sign the house over to the cat!” I said, “Do you hear yourself right now?!” He’d been doing that our whole life. When I was older, I said, “I gotta start writing this down, this is classic dadisms right here.” He would just yell. He yelled at everything. You got used to it and then it just became comedy. SBM: (still laughing) Curt: That’s how that went down. He still yells. He yells at everything. If you go to his house, you’ll hear him. He’ll yell at my mom for something…like the other day, she pulled the drawer out of the stove too far and he says, “I don’t understand why you had to do that! Who builds something that-“ Just go over to the house, you’ll see in five minutes where it all came from. SBM: Even – you think they’re gonna be stereotype videos – like the parking chairs but no, it’s all so true. Curt: It’s the way it is. Everyone’s cut from that Yinzer cloth. I don’t know who started it but it spread like wildfire somewhere in about the mid-50s. They started making that guy and they still make him. Everyone has a little bit of Pittsburgh Dad in them, everyone. Doesn’t matter if you’re man, woman, whatever. If you’re from around here, you got a part of Pittsburgh Dad in you. SBM: What kind of reactions do you get? Obviously pretty much everybody here goes nuts, but what kind of reactions do you get from outside? Curt: We have fans from all over the world. This year we really focused on the Steelers and decided we were going to do a video every week. We have fans who are Bengals fans, Ravens fans, Cowboys fans who say, “I hate the Steelers, but I love your show.” The more we keep doing it and growing it, the more it gets to a bigger fanbase. For a while, we were really just regional, but recently we’ve been branching out. We hope to continue to make it grow. SBM: I’m curious: If the Dad shoes that you lost in the move could talk, what would they say and what stories would they tell? Curt: I wore them for so many episodes. Sometimes we’d film the Zoo episode or Kennywood and there’d be a lot of anxiety because when I’m around a big crowd and filming, I get tense. There’s a lot of laughs in them, a lot of tension in them. The soles fell off, that’s how much we used them, and I threw them away like an idiot. They served us well for a long time. I wish I had them. SBM: You’re talking about Kennywood, and that whole thing with Noah’s Ark and bringing back the whale was hilarious. What were some of the coolest things that you’ve gotten to do with the show itself? Curt: That was really cool, getting to dedicate Noah’s Ark. We had been talking about the whale being gone – Chris and I talked about that since it’s been gone I think. SBM: I’ve been complaining about that for a long time. Curt: Oh man. They announced that it was coming back and to get to dedicate it was awesome. I got to write that little tribute to Noah’s Ark and the strangest thing was being in the back of Noah’s Ark by myself and it’s shaking and going back and forth and I’m like, “I’m getting really sick.” As a kid, I could probably sit in that thing for hours, but I’m in the back getting sick and I can’t hear because all of the animals are going (makes animal noises) and the ride’s going (makes a whining horn sound) and I’m trying to hear the cue. Eventually I just didn’t hear it and so I kind of crawled out and they’re all just waiting for me for about a minute and a half. I’m like, “OKAY!” That was really cool to do that. Anytime we get to go to Steelers. That organization just treats you like family, such class acts up there with Mr. Rooney and General Manager Kevin Colbert and Mike Tomlin. The players are really cool. That’s always a blast because I get to take my dad up there and he has a great time – he complains a lot to the general manger. Kevin’s really cool, he’s a Pittsburgh guy. I’m like, “Dad, he doesn’t – don’t start,” and he’s going “I don’t know why you let some of these guys on the team!” I wish I could just film it. Kevin just laughs. They kind of grew up in the same way, so they have a lot in common. Getting to go to different parts of Pittsburgh and put a little humor on every part of the town. It’s really cool. We love it and we don’t plan on stopping anytime soon. SBM: I feel like that’s not something you have to worry about. Curt: Chris and I, every week we’re down here after the game filming and we’re just cracking up. We have to stop forever because we think it’s funny and then that line doesn’t get any laughs in the show. We have a good time. SBM: I still just think it is the coolest tribute to your dad. Curt: I’d love to get him on an episode once, but he just kind of freezes up whenever you put him on camera. SBM: That’s when you just pull in the secret camera idea and go for it. Curt: I know. I really should. I wish I could, but he really swears so it would all be beeped. I would love to set up a camera and watch the game with him. “WHY the hell would you run a tackle on that play? That’s the stupidest call I’ve ever seen! If you lose the game, you’ll know why!” Nothing beat when I was a kid – I was probably 15 or 16 – and we lost Super Bowl XXX. He spazzed. He was up at the TV screaming at it. He’s storming around. I didn’t get that into it then because I was still learning how to get really into it. It was hysterical, the level of anger. There’s times when I’ve gotten yelled at, but him yelling then will always stick out when he yelled the loudest. SBM: It's so funny because I was talking to my dad last night and I said to him that I think the two times I remember of him really yelling when I didn't do something stupid were Super Bowl XXX where the dog's hiding in the shower - Curt: (He laughs) Oh yeah. The dogs would always hide. SBM: The dog's hiding, my dad's screaming, my mom's yelling at him for yelling...and then when Hills went out. That was the other time my dad lost his mind. Curt: Stuff like that bothers my dad, too. My mom can't stand watching games with us. If I go over...My mom likes watching the games, but then we get too into it. She'll go, "I can't watch this with you guys. You ruin everything. Why are you screaming? I'm just gonna leave." Then she goes to Target. "You guys make me so nervous. Why can't you just sit down and watch the game?" I'll be behind the couch and then I'll start clapping. She says it's too tense for her. I don't know how you can sit in tense situations! I pace back and forth, I lay down, I hide under things. It's crazy. SBM: I'm really excited for the hidden camera video now. Curt: He'll just be sitting there with his beer, yelling. He'll just recline and scream. Then he complains about everything else going on. They'll show the coaches on the sideline, or they'll show the other fans - he hates that. He's like, "Look at those idiots! Who would dress like that?" Meanwhile they'll show someone from Pittsburgh in a skull mask and he's like, "Look at that guy! That's great!" SBM: Your shoes have had a blast over the years. If you could walk in someone else's, whose would they be? Curt: I'd walk in my mom's shoes to understand how she put up with my dad all these years. I don't know how she does. She just looks at me and says, "I can't...I can't deal with your father anymore." The older he gets, the more Old Man Pittsburgh Dad he gets. She's a very patient woman and to walk in her shoes...My dad and I are not patient. She's saint-like. I'd say my dad's shoes...but we had a cat that tended to throw up in his shoes. SBM: (Laughs) Curt: True story! All the shoes would be lined up - don't leave them on the steps because if he trips on them in the morning, he'd throw them outside. He had a couple pairs of shoes, I had two, my sister had two or three, and the cat would always puke in his. (He laughs.) SBM: Well and I feel like in a way, you're already walking in your dad's shoes. Curt: I am! I'm slowly transitioning. My wife will tell you - she says, "You're just more like your dad all the time," and I am. With the heat? She'll start, "Can we -" and I'm like, "It's 65! That's plenty!" "But 70?" "70?! Don't ask to go on vacation then. We're not going on vacation with running it at 70. No Valentine's presents, how's that?" I never thought I'd be like that. (He laughs.) SBM: What's been the most rewarding thing for you on this whole crazy ride? Curt: Getting to laugh with the city and the people who call the city home. It's crazy that we all have the same memories and we can all relate to the same situations and stories whether it's the pool in the summer or trick or treating in this area or Christmas and New Year's traditions. It's all the same! Slamming the screen door, wasting paper towels - which I didn't realize you could waste paper towels. My dad'd be like, "What are you doing?" "I-probably the wrong thing." It's funny - parents in other cities get together to brag about the achievements of their children. "Oh, my child's on the honor roll" or "My child is the best in their little league." Our parents would all get together and try to top each other on the dumbass things us kids were doing. "Ah, the other day, my kid's painting and he doesn't set anything down there and it leaks down under and stains the table!" "Well I got that beat. The kid came in with mud all over his shoes and walked up the steps!" I remember! It's not accolades. But that's it - We're all part of that same family. That's really cool, reading what people post and getting emails saying they were down and it made them laugh or soldier overseas from Pittsburgh saying that's helped them keep a piece of Pittsburgh and laugh in some of the most hostile conditions. That's really cool and I'm really happy about that kind of stuff. From the man behind the Dad to the Dad himself – it wouldn’t be a Pittsburgh Father’s Day without chatting with Pittsburgh Dad, too!
SBM: (Still laughing) We were kind of talking about your dad earlier, what was it like for you growing up with that quintessential Pittsburgh Dad?  Curt: I always say when I was really little, he was very intimidating. He was a thicker, bigger dude, a weight lifter. He was just intimidating. He didn’t take any crap. When he said something, he’d yell at you, you’d do it, you’d listen to him.  When I got to be a teenager especially, he’d start saying something and my sister and I would just laugh. We’re like, “Do you realize what you’re saying? It’s hysterical.” One time, he was flipping out because the cat that we had tore open the trash bag. He goes off: “I can’t believe this cat! The cat thinks it owns the house! I might as well sign the house over to the cat!” I said, “Do you hear yourself right now?!” He’d been doing that our whole life. When I was older, I said, “I gotta start writing this down, this is classic dadisms right here.” He would just yell. He yelled at everything. You got used to it and then it just became comedy.  SBM: (still laughing)  Curt: That’s how that went down. He still yells. He yells at everything. If you go to his house, you’ll hear him. He’ll yell at my mom for something…like the other day, she pulled the drawer out of the stove too far and he says, “I don’t understand why you had to do that! Who builds something that-“  Just go over to the house, you’ll see in five minutes where it all came from.  SBM: Even – you think they’re gonna be stereotype videos – like the parking chairs but no, it’s all so true.  Curt: It’s the way it is. Everyone’s cut from that Yinzer cloth. I don’t know who started it but it spread like wildfire somewhere in about the mid-50s. They started making that guy and they still make him. Everyone has a little bit of Pittsburgh Dad in them, everyone. Doesn’t matter if you’re man, woman, whatever. If you’re from around here, you got a part of Pittsburgh Dad in you.  SBM: What kind of reactions do you get? Obviously pretty much everybody here goes nuts, but what kind of reactions do you get from outside?  Curt: We have fans from all over the world. This year we really focused on the Steelers and decided we were going to do a video every week. We have fans who are Bengals fans, Ravens fans, Cowboys fans who say, “I hate the Steelers, but I love your show.” The more we keep doing it and growing it, the more it gets to a bigger fanbase. For a while, we were really just regional, but recently we’ve been branching out. We hope to continue to make it grow.  SBM: I’m curious: If the Dad shoes that you lost in the move could talk, what would they say and what stories would they tell?  Curt: I wore them for so many episodes. Sometimes we’d film the Zoo episode or Kennywood and there’d be a lot of anxiety because when I’m around a big crowd and filming, I get tense. There’s a lot of laughs in them, a lot of tension in them. The soles fell off, that’s how much we used them, and I threw them away like an idiot. They served us well for a long time. I wish I had them.  SBM: You’re talking about Kennywood, and that whole thing with Noah’s Ark and bringing back the whale was hilarious. What were some of the coolest things that you’ve gotten to do with the show itself?  Curt: That was really cool, getting to dedicate Noah’s Ark. We had been talking about the whale being gone – Chris and I talked about that since it’s been gone I think.  SBM: I’ve been complaining about that for a long time.  Curt: Oh man. They announced that it was coming back and to get to dedicate it was awesome. I got to write that little tribute to Noah’s Ark and the strangest thing was being in the back of Noah’s Ark by myself and it’s shaking and going back and forth and I’m like, “I’m getting really sick.” As a kid, I could probably sit in that thing for hours, but I’m in the back getting sick and I can’t hear because all of the animals are going (makes animal noises) and the ride’s going (makes a whining horn sound) and I’m trying to hear the cue.  Eventually I just didn’t hear it and so I kind of crawled out and they’re all just waiting for me for about a minute and a half. I’m like, “OKAY!”  That was really cool to do that. Anytime we get to go to Steelers. That organization just treats you like family, such class acts up there with Mr. Rooney and General Manager Kevin Colbert and Mike Tomlin. The players are really cool. That’s always a blast because I get to take my dad up there and he has a great time – he complains a lot to the general manger. Kevin’s really cool, he’s a Pittsburgh guy. I’m like, “Dad, he doesn’t – don’t start,” and he’s going “I don’t know why you let some of these guys on the team!” I wish I could just film it. Kevin just laughs. They kind of grew up in the same way, so they have a lot in common.  Getting to go to different parts of Pittsburgh and put a little humor on every part of the town. It’s really cool. We love it and we don’t plan on stopping anytime soon.  SBM: I feel like that’s not something you have to worry about.  Curt: Chris and I, every week we’re down here after the game filming and we’re just cracking up. We have to stop forever because we think it’s funny and then that line doesn’t get any laughs in the show. We have a good time.  SBM: I still just think it is the coolest tribute to your dad.  Curt: I’d love to get him on an episode once, but he just kind of freezes up whenever you put him on camera.  SBM: That’s when you just pull in the secret camera idea and go for it.  Curt: I know. I really should. I wish I could, but he really swears so it would all be beeped. I would love to set up a camera and watch the game with him. “WHY the hell would you run a tackle on that play? That’s the stupidest call I’ve ever seen! If you lose the game, you’ll know why!”  Nothing beat when I was a kid – I was probably 15 or 16 – and we lost Super Bowl XXX. He spazzed. He was up at the TV screaming at it. He’s storming around. I didn’t get that into it then because I was still learning how to get really into it. It was hysterical, the level of anger. There’s times when I’ve gotten yelled at, but him yelling then will always stick out when he yelled the loudest.  SBM: It's so funny because I was talking to my dad last night and I said to him that I think the two times I remember of him really yelling when I didn't do something stupid were Super Bowl XXX where the dog's hiding in the shower -  Curt: (He laughs) Oh yeah. The dogs would always hide.  SBM: The dog's hiding, my dad's screaming, my mom's yelling at him for yelling...and then when Hills went out. That was the other time my dad lost his mind.  Curt: Stuff like that bothers my dad, too. My mom can't stand watching games with us. If I go over...My mom likes watching the games, but then we get too into it. She'll go, "I can't watch this with you guys. You ruin everything. Why are you screaming? I'm just gonna leave." Then she goes to Target. "You guys make me so nervous. Why can't you just sit down and watch the game?" I'll be behind the couch and then I'll start clapping. She says it's too tense for her.  I don't know how you can sit in tense situations! I pace back and forth, I lay down, I hide under things. It's crazy.  SBM: I'm really excited for the hidden camera video now.  Curt: He'll just be sitting there with his beer, yelling. He'll just recline and scream. Then he complains about everything else going on. They'll show the coaches on the sideline, or they'll show the other fans - he hates that. He's like, "Look at those idiots! Who would dress like that?" Meanwhile they'll show someone from Pittsburgh in a skull mask and he's like, "Look at that guy! That's great!"  SBM: Your shoes have had a blast over the years. If you could walk in someone else's, whose would they be?  Curt: I'd walk in my mom's shoes to understand how she put up with my dad all these years. I don't know how she does. She just looks at me and says, "I can't...I can't deal with your father anymore." The older he gets, the more Old Man Pittsburgh Dad he gets. She's a very patient woman and to walk in her shoes...My dad and I are not patient. She's saint-like.  I'd say my dad's shoes...but we had a cat that tended to throw up in his shoes.  SBM: (Laughs)  Curt: True story! All the shoes would be lined up - don't leave them on the steps because if he trips on them in the morning, he'd throw them outside. He had a couple pairs of shoes, I had two, my sister had two or three, and the cat would always puke in his. (He laughs.)  SBM: Well and I feel like in a way, you're already walking in your dad's shoes.  Curt: I am! I'm slowly transitioning. My wife will tell you - she says, "You're just more like your dad all the time," and I am. With the heat? She'll start, "Can we -" and I'm like, "It's 65! That's plenty!" "But 70?" "70?! Don't ask to go on vacation then. We're not going on vacation with running it at 70. No Valentine's presents, how's that?" I never thought I'd be like that. (He laughs.)  SBM: What's been the most rewarding thing for you on this whole crazy ride?  Curt: Getting to laugh with the city and the people who call the city home. It's crazy that we all have the same memories and we can all relate to the same situations and stories whether it's the pool in the summer or trick or treating in this area or Christmas and New Year's traditions. It's all the same!  Slamming the screen door, wasting paper towels - which I didn't realize you could waste paper towels. My dad'd be like, "What are you doing?" "I-probably the wrong thing."  It's funny - parents in other cities get together to brag about the achievements of their children. "Oh, my child's on the honor roll" or "My child is the best in their little league." Our parents would all get together and try to top each other on the dumbass things us kids were doing. "Ah, the other day, my kid's painting and he doesn't set anything down there and it leaks down under and stains the table!" "Well I got that beat. The kid came in with mud all over his shoes and walked up the steps!" I remember! It's not accolades.  But that's it - We're all part of that same family.  That's really cool, reading what people post and getting emails saying they were down and it made them laugh or soldier overseas from Pittsburgh saying that's helped them keep a piece of Pittsburgh and laugh in some of the most hostile conditions. That's really cool and I'm really happy about that kind of stuff.  From the man behind the Dad to the Dad himself – it wouldn’t be a Pittsburgh Father’s Day without chatting with Pittsburgh Dad, too!

SBM: (Still laughing) We were kind of talking about your dad earlier, what was it like for you growing up with that quintessential Pittsburgh Dad?

Curt: I always say when I was really little, he was very intimidating. He was a thicker, bigger dude, a weight lifter. He was just intimidating. He didn’t take any crap. When he said something, he’d yell at you, you’d do it, you’d listen to him.

When I got to be a teenager especially, he’d start saying something and my sister and I would just laugh. We’re like, “Do you realize what you’re saying? It’s hysterical.” One time, he was flipping out because the cat that we had tore open the trash bag. He goes off: “I can’t believe this cat! The cat thinks it owns the house! I might as well sign the house over to the cat!” I said, “Do you hear yourself right now?!” He’d been doing that our whole life. When I was older, I said, “I gotta start writing this down, this is classic dadisms right here.” He would just yell. He yelled at everything. You got used to it and then it just became comedy.

SBM: (still laughing)

Curt: That’s how that went down. He still yells. He yells at everything. If you go to his house, you’ll hear him. He’ll yell at my mom for something…like the other day, she pulled the drawer out of the stove too far and he says, “I don’t understand why you had to do that! Who builds something that-“

Just go over to the house, you’ll see in five minutes where it all came from.

SBM: Even – you think they’re gonna be stereotype videos – like the parking chairs but no, it’s all so true.

Curt: It’s the way it is. Everyone’s cut from that Yinzer cloth. I don’t know who started it but it spread like wildfire somewhere in about the mid-50s. They started making that guy and they still make him. Everyone has a little bit of Pittsburgh Dad in them, everyone. Doesn’t matter if you’re man, woman, whatever. If you’re from around here, you got a part of Pittsburgh Dad in you.

SBM: What kind of reactions do you get? Obviously pretty much everybody here goes nuts, but what kind of reactions do you get from outside?

Curt: We have fans from all over the world. This year we really focused on the Steelers and decided we were going to do a video every week. We have fans who are Bengals fans, Ravens fans, Cowboys fans who say, “I hate the Steelers, but I love your show.” The more we keep doing it and growing it, the more it gets to a bigger fanbase. For a while, we were really just regional, but recently we’ve been branching out. We hope to continue to make it grow.

SBM: I’m curious: If the Dad shoes that you lost in the move could talk, what would they say and what stories would they tell?

Curt: I wore them for so many episodes. Sometimes we’d film the Zoo episode or Kennywood and there’d be a lot of anxiety because when I’m around a big crowd and filming, I get tense. There’s a lot of laughs in them, a lot of tension in them. The soles fell off, that’s how much we used them, and I threw them away like an idiot. They served us well for a long time. I wish I had them.

SBM: You’re talking about Kennywood, and that whole thing with Noah’s Ark and bringing back the whale was hilarious. What were some of the coolest things that you’ve gotten to do with the show itself?

Curt: That was really cool, getting to dedicate Noah’s Ark. We had been talking about the whale being gone – Chris and I talked about that since it’s been gone I think.

SBM: I’ve been complaining about that for a long time.

Curt: Oh man. They announced that it was coming back and to get to dedicate it was awesome. I got to write that little tribute to Noah’s Ark and the strangest thing was being in the back of Noah’s Ark by myself and it’s shaking and going back and forth and I’m like, “I’m getting really sick.” As a kid, I could probably sit in that thing for hours, but I’m in the back getting sick and I can’t hear because all of the animals are going (makes animal noises) and the ride’s going (makes a whining horn sound) and I’m trying to hear the cue.

Eventually I just didn’t hear it and so I kind of crawled out and they’re all just waiting for me for about a minute and a half. I’m like, “OKAY!”

That was really cool to do that. Anytime we get to go to Steelers. That organization just treats you like family, such class acts up there with Mr. Rooney and General Manager Kevin Colbert and Mike Tomlin. The players are really cool. That’s always a blast because I get to take my dad up there and he has a great time – he complains a lot to the general manger. Kevin’s really cool, he’s a Pittsburgh guy. I’m like, “Dad, he doesn’t – don’t start,” and he’s going “I don’t know why you let some of these guys on the team!” I wish I could just film it. Kevin just laughs. They kind of grew up in the same way, so they have a lot in common.

Getting to go to different parts of Pittsburgh and put a little humor on every part of the town. It’s really cool. We love it and we don’t plan on stopping anytime soon.

SBM: I feel like that’s not something you have to worry about.

Curt: Chris and I, every week we’re down here after the game filming and we’re just cracking up. We have to stop forever because we think it’s funny and then that line doesn’t get any laughs in the show. We have a good time.

Curt Wootton - Pittsburgh Dad
Curt Wootton - Pittsburgh Dad
Curt Wootton - Pittsburgh Dad

SBM: I still just think it is the coolest tribute to your dad.

Curt: I’d love to get him on an episode once, but he just kind of freezes up whenever you put him on camera.

SBM: That’s when you just pull in the secret camera idea and go for it.

Curt: I know. I really should. I wish I could, but he really swears so it would all be beeped. I would love to set up a camera and watch the game with him. “WHY the hell would you run a tackle on that play? That’s the stupidest call I’ve ever seen! If you lose the game, you’ll know why!”

Nothing beat when I was a kid – I was probably 15 or 16 – and we lost Super Bowl XXX. He spazzed. He was up at the TV screaming at it. He’s storming around. I didn’t get that into it then because I was still learning how to get really into it. It was hysterical, the level of anger. There’s times when I’ve gotten yelled at, but him yelling then will always stick out when he yelled the loudest.

SBM: It's so funny because I was talking to my dad last night and I said to him that I think the two times I remember of him really yelling when I didn't do something stupid were Super Bowl XXX where the dog's hiding in the shower -

Curt: (He laughs) Oh yeah. The dogs would always hide.

SBM: The dog's hiding, my dad's screaming, my mom's yelling at him for yelling...and then when Hills went out. That was the other time my dad lost his mind.

Curt: Stuff like that bothers my dad, too. My mom can't stand watching games with us. If I go over...My mom likes watching the games, but then we get too into it. She'll go, "I can't watch this with you guys. You ruin everything. Why are you screaming? I'm just gonna leave." Then she goes to Target. "You guys make me so nervous. Why can't you just sit down and watch the game?" I'll be behind the couch and then I'll start clapping. She says it's too tense for her.

I don't know how you can sit in tense situations! I pace back and forth, I lay down, I hide under things. It's crazy.

SBM: I'm really excited for the hidden camera video now.

Curt: He'll just be sitting there with his beer, yelling. He'll just recline and scream. Then he complains about everything else going on. They'll show the coaches on the sideline, or they'll show the other fans - he hates that. He's like, "Look at those idiots! Who would dress like that?" Meanwhile they'll show someone from Pittsburgh in a skull mask and he's like, "Look at that guy! That's great!"

SBM: Your shoes have had a blast over the years. If you could walk in someone else's, whose would they be?

Curt: I'd walk in my mom's shoes to understand how she put up with my dad all these years. I don't know how she does. She just looks at me and says, "I can't...I can't deal with your father anymore." The older he gets, the more Old Man Pittsburgh Dad he gets. She's a very patient woman and to walk in her shoes...My dad and I are not patient. She's saint-like.

I'd say my dad's shoes...but we had a cat that tended to throw up in his shoes.

SBM: (Laughs)

Curt: True story! All the shoes would be lined up - don't leave them on the steps because if he trips on them in the morning, he'd throw them outside. He had a couple pairs of shoes, I had two, my sister had two or three, and the cat would always puke in his. (He laughs.)

SBM: Well and I feel like in a way, you're already walking in your dad's shoes.

Curt: I am! I'm slowly transitioning. My wife will tell you - she says, "You're just more like your dad all the time," and I am. With the heat? She'll start, "Can we -" and I'm like, "It's 65! That's plenty!" "But 70?" "70?! Don't ask to go on vacation then. We're not going on vacation with running it at 70. No Valentine's presents, how's that?" I never thought I'd be like that. (He laughs.)

SBM: What's been the most rewarding thing for you on this whole crazy ride?

Curt: Getting to laugh with the city and the people who call the city home. It's crazy that we all have the same memories and we can all relate to the same situations and stories whether it's the pool in the summer or trick or treating in this area or Christmas and New Year's traditions. It's all the same!

Slamming the screen door, wasting paper towels - which I didn't realize you could waste paper towels. My dad'd be like, "What are you doing?" "I-probably the wrong thing."

It's funny - parents in other cities get together to brag about the achievements of their children. "Oh, my child's on the honor roll" or "My child is the best in their little league." Our parents would all get together and try to top each other on the dumbass things us kids were doing. "Ah, the other day, my kid's painting and he doesn't set anything down there and it leaks down under and stains the table!" "Well I got that beat. The kid came in with mud all over his shoes and walked up the steps!" I remember! It's not accolades.

But that's it - We're all part of that same family.

That's really cool, reading what people post and getting emails saying they were down and it made them laugh or soldier overseas from Pittsburgh saying that's helped them keep a piece of Pittsburgh and laugh in some of the most hostile conditions. That's really cool and I'm really happy about that kind of stuff.

Curt Wootton - Pittsburgh Dad
Curt Wootton - Pittsburgh Dad
Curt Wootton - Pittsburgh Dad

From the man behind the Dad to the Dad himself –
it wouldn’t be a Pittsburgh Father’s Day without chatting with Pittsburgh Dad, too!

Pittsburgh Dad: You take your shoes off before you come down here? (He looks down to be sure and nods.) Good.

SBM: Pittsburgh Dad, thanks for taking a couple of minutes to talk to us about a day that's really all about you and other dads. Let's start there - What does it mean to be a Pittsburgh Dad?

Pittsburgh Dad: What does it mean to be - what kind of question is that? Ya know, you have kids and you just do it. It don't mean nothing but taking care of your kids and family. People make it aht to be this - ya know - you're this martyr - you're not. You take care of your wife and your kids and that's the way it is. That's what it means: It's doing the right thing. Yeah. Jeeze.

(He looks at Curt.) You believe that question?

Curt Wootton - Pittsburgh DadCurt: I don't know, she's the one asking.

Pittsburgh Dad: Well it's a weird question. Something like a jag would ask.

Curt: Don't be mean!

SBM: Dad, this was something I asked Curt - what's something outsiders don't understand about Pittsburgh?

Pittsburgh Dad: First of all, that we're the best sports tahn ever, no matter what those jags tell ya. They're wrong. They don't got nothing. We got the best food, the best people, the best sports. 'Cept we got tunnels and I don't like those. Jeeze. I've never heard of - who slows dahn in a tunnel? It's ridiculous! Other than that, it's the best city and they don't know that 'cuz they ain't from here. They'll try to tell ya different, I always tell 'em: Six Super Bowls. Yeah. Best city ever.

SBM: I'm definitely not arguing with you. Dad, what is your ideal Father's Day?

Pittsburgh Dad: Ideal Father's Day? That's easy: gettin' rid of my family for the day so's I can just sit dahn and not have to hear people makin' noise and trackin' mud through the hause and slammin' doors. Maybe havin' an Ahrn City or two and gettin' some yard work done, takin' a little nap on the recliner. Yeah.

SBM: I like it.

Pittsburgh Dad: No kids. Father's Day kids are aht the door by 7 and I don't wanna see them until...the next day. Maybe they can camp aht - but not on my grass because the tent kills the grass! They can go camp aht at their friend's hause. That dad at the friend's hause don't know nothin'. He kept his screens in all winter if ya can believe that. That's a good way to ruin 'em.

Curt: Dad, come on now.

Pittsburgh Dad: Well it's true! You take your screens aht! You kids think money grows on trees, well it don't. Jeeze. I gotta retire some day, ya know, and I gotta have some money left 'cuz that Social Security ain't gonna be there, I can tell ya that right now. When you kids are older, it sure as hell ain't gonna be there.

Curt: Okay, okay, it's not gonna be there.

Pittsburgh Dad: Well, it's not!

SBM: Dad, do you have a message to Pittsburgh?

Pittsburgh Dad: I love Pittsburgh. I wouldn't live anywhere else....'cept I might be one of those people who goes dahn to Florida after the season's over and come back in April. I don't wanna be there in the summer. It's too hot and they have those weird palmetto bugs that crawl all over your face. Blegh.


For more of Pittsburgh Dad, be sure to check out the show on YouTube, as well as following along on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. You can find Curt at his Twitter account.

Social Sports Calendar (This Day in Sports)


Check out the Social Sports Calendar Here!


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Dads & Grads Issue

RAMP Fashion for a Cause
RAMP Fashion for a Cause

Have you been Seen?

Check out our Photo Vault for more photos:

Yoda Babies at Magee Women's Hospital
Yoda Babies at Magee Women's Hospital

Pittsburgh Wine Festival
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MAKEnight 21+: May the Fourth Be With You
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Food Truck-a-Palooza
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Truck-a-Palooza

Fern Hollow Nature Center Kentucky Derby Party
Fern Hollow Nature Center Kentucky Derby Party

Dick's Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon
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Maecenas XXXIII
Maecenas
XXXIII

Pittsburgh Made it Dope Showcase
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Susan G Komen Race for the Cure
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EQT Children's Theater Festival
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Junior League of Pittsburgh Touch a Truck
Junior League of Pittsburgh
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Gemini Children's Theater 11th Annual Royal Ball

NamastHAY Yoga
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RAMP Fashion for a Cause
RAMP Fashion
for a Cause

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Tails

Bakery Square Summer Kick Off
Bakery Square Summer Kick Off

Gene Kelly Awards
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Kelly
Awards

Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Day Celebration
Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Day Celebration


Social Psychology - Top 10 Motivational Quotes

By Faith Bennett, Licensed Psychotherapist

Our Summer Quarterly has us *mostly* enjoying a change in shift - for summer.  The days are warmer and more relaxed…  But before all the vacations and picnics, we must wrap up the school year with remembering our Dads and Grads - both BIG SHOES to fill.  Both mean bigger responsibilities.  Both are approached with excitement of what’s ahead, mixed with a dose of anticipatory anxiety.  Whether one is a new Dad, or somewhere else along the lifespan - Whether one is graduating High School, Undergraduate Studies, or Graduate School, - We can all use some good advice!  Here is a Top Ten List of some our Favorite Quotes for these occasions.  Happy Celebrating, Dads and Grads!!!

1.
Wherever you go, go with all your heart.
– Confucius –

2. What feels like the END, is often the BEGINNING.

3. Every accomplishment starts
with the decision to try.
– John F. Kennedy –

4. Always greet the future with anticipation; You’ll be off to a good start!

5. Make the most of yourself, for that
is all there is of you.
– Ralph Waldo Emerson –

6. Turn your CANT’S into CANS and you’re your dreams into PLANS.

7. Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm.

8. Behind You – All your memories; Before You – All your dreams; Around You – All who love you; Within You – All you need.

9. ONE DAY or DAY ONE – You Decide!

10. No matter where you are from,
your dreams are valid.
– Lupita Nyongo –



Social Psychology Calendar


Check out the Social Psychology Calendar here!


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FUN:

Piano Recital


FASHION:

Harry Potter
Theme


FOOD:

Show Snacks


Fun, Fashion, & Food: Piano Recital
Quiet with the wrappers!

Food: 1. Swedish Fish 2. Nestle Raisinets 3. Junior Mints 4. Nestle Goobers

Fashion: 1. Black Oxford Shoes (Macy's)  2. Hedwig's Theme Music Sheets 3. Harry Potter Cosplay Dress (Hot Topic) 

Fun, Fashion, & Food: Piano Recital


social-animal_heading

Social Animal: NamastHAY Goat Yoga

See more photos from the

NamastHay Goat Yoga

in our Photo Vault here!

Social Animal: Fashion Tails

See more photos from the

Fashion Tails

in our Photo Vault here!

Animal Friends’ Bark N’at

See more photos from the

Animal Friends' Bark N'at

in our Photo Vault here!


social_seen_heading

EQT Equality March
EQT Equality March

Have you been Seen?

Check out our Photo Vault for more photos:

Great Night Gala
Great Night Gala

A Tour & Tasting in Old Allegheny
A Tour & Tasting in Old Allegheny

Three Rivers Arts Festival
Three Rivers Arts Festival

Lawrenceville Annual Garden Tour
Lawrenceville Annual Garden Tour

EQT Equality March
EQT Equality March

Pridefest
Pridefest

Celebrating Broadway! Tony Viewing Party
Celebrating Broadway! Tony Viewing Party

21+ Prom
21+ Prom

Atlatl Competition
Atlatl
Competition

Stanley Cup Victory Parade
Stanley Cup Victory Parade

Animal Friends’ Bark N’at
Animal Friends’ Bark N’at

Primanti Bros. Pre-Opening Party
Primanti Bros. Pre-Opening Party

Kennywood Kids Fest
Kennywood Kids Fest

Anthrocon
Anthrocon


socialsoles_headingInterviewed by Kiley Fischer
with Introduction by Faith Bennett

Dan DelBianco - Pittsburgh Grand Prix

Pittsburgh Vintage Grand PrixThe Social Soles interview series is based on the saying, “You don’t really know someone until you have walked in his shoes.” We thought it would be interesting to begin each interview asking our guest to bring a pair of shoes that are significant to him. They can be the pair he wore the first time he went to Schenley Park to take in the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix; The ones he while he bought a poster that would change his life; The pair he wore when he suggested the design firm’s 2003 pro bono work; The pair he wore as he walked across the Allegheny Valley School campus; Those he wore when he rode in his first vintage race car; A pair we would have never guessed...What shoes will he bring?

We associate shoes with memories: good and bad. The question steers the path of the conversation. This route will show us a side usually not seen in the one we are talking with. A more personal side. We are excited to see in which direction we are lead – by the choice in footwear and the memories stirred. Come. Let’s take a classic walk…

July marks the transformation of Schenley Park from average city park to the only street race course for vintage cars. Racers flock to the city of Pittsburgh to put on a show for hundreds of thousands that turns into funding for organizations helping some of society’s most vulnerable. Dan DelBianco, the Executive Director of the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix, sat down with us to shed light on one of the city’s most anticipated and special events.

Social Butterfly Magazine: The Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix is such a cool event and we’re so excited to talk to you more about it. Let’s kick right off: which shoes did you bring to share with us?

Dan DelBianco: I brought two - we have race shoes obviously for the Grand Prix. There actually are special racing shoes because the heel comes up around the side and it’s a hard surface because in a race car, you sometimes have real rough surfaces. A soft sneaker or something else might get stuck. You’re stepping on the accelerator or the brake and you don’t want to feel it popping through.

Our event, we really divide it internally into two sides: race side and show side. Race side, obviously, we’ve got races each weekend. Show side is kind of everything else. Most of show side is the car show and all the tents out at Schenley Park, but also the black tie and other events. That’s kind of the line and these (he points to his intentionally dirty boot) really represent show side because as much as you’d think I’d be really dressed up for the weekend at Schenley Park, I’m everywhere as part of my job and I’ve really come to appreciate it.

They’re all dirty because we start setting up a week ahead of time to turn a city park into a race track and show field. We don’t’ just roll in Saturday morning and here it is. I’m out there almost every day for a week whether it’s putting up tents or helping put up snow fence with our incredible volunteers. It’s all about being in the park at 7 o clock in the morning when it’s still wet from the dew and marking off and helping put up tents, setting up, tearing down. Those become the shoes I wear for a week.

SBM: They’re just as multipurpose as you and your job title, really.

Dan: I don’t know what’s going to happen, so I put on the boots. Even Saturday and Sunday as part of the opening ceremonies I have long pants on so you can’t tell they’re essentially hiking boots. (He laughs.) I just couldn’t imagine how many miles I’ve put on a golf cart just constantly on the move. It’s 456 acres of park. We’re in many, many different parts of it.

SBM: Tell me about the Grand Prix in general. Where did all of this start?

Dan: It started 35 years ago. A couple of racers, car enthusiasts, got together and wanted to hold a race in Schenley Park. If you’ve ever driven the course, you see that it is just a natural, almost amphitheater feel to it with all the hills leading down to the roads and the serpentine. We didn’t construct the course at all. It’s there.

What we do though, is bring in jersey barriers, miles of snow fence, to make it safe for the public to watch. We call it “building the race course,” but really, we’re just adapting what’s there.

There’s 1,200 volunteers that come together to make it happen and that’s really what’s special about the Grand Prix. We’ll be celebrating and recognizing volunteers in our 35th year.

SBM: That’s a huge number of people, really for anything, but seeing that many people coming together to volunteer, that has to mean a lot to see, but the cause also must mean a lot to the volunteers.

Dan: Our charities are the Autism Society of Pittsburgh and Allegheny Valley School (AVS).

SBM: Where did that partnership come from?

Dan: It was really in the beginning when the idea was presented to Mayor Caliguiri. Dan Torisky from the Autism Society and Regis Champ who was with Allegheny Valley School at the time, went with Myron Cope to talk to the mayor about the race and that it would benefit those two charities. Here we are, 35 years later, and we’re still with those charities. It’s a perfect match. We’ve got one large charity and one small and we’re able to help both of them. And, they help us: most of our volunteers come from the friends and family of people there. All the merchandise booths are run by family members – people who have family members that are residents out at AVS. The entire Autism Society helps run the club house and patron parking, so it really is a family.

SBM: That is really, really special to see. How did you get involved in all of this?

Dan: I got involved with this poster here (he points to the 2003 poster.) I was with a design firm called Bradley Brown design, sitting around a conference table after I had just started. We were discussing what pro bono work we would do for charities. The artist said, “we want something that’s really fun to work on and something Dan can get out there with.”

The lightbulb went off in my head because I had a Grand Prix poster hanging in my office. I wasn’t necessarily a Grand Prix person – I had gone one year, loved it, bought a poster, and put it on my wall. I went next door, took the poster off my wall, and brought it in the room. I said, “I know Dan Torisky from the Autism Society. How about I talk to the Grand Prix?” That 2003 poster is the one that was done when I was at Bradley Brown Designs. It’s still one of my favorite posters.

SBM: It is a very cool poster.

Dan: Isn’t it? It’s done by Mark Bender here in Pittsburgh. The posters really tell the story of the Grand Prix.

SBM: I was admiring the ones in here and they are really so cool.

Dan: Each one highlights the event. There’s a story behind every poster and the work is all donated. It’s mostly local Pittsburgh artists, but there are some national artists.

Backtracking a little bit, I went to the check presentation that first year and when the check was unveiled, I thought, “Oh, my God. You could raise that with a good golf outing.” I also didn’t understand the costs involved to put on the races. It’s mind-boggling.

We have to rent the golf course for five days. We’ve got to bring in barriers and snow fence and port a john’s. We have to bring in golf carts. We have to clean up the trash. Insurance. The hope is that we leave the park the way we found it. It’s an incredible transformation.

SBM: I feel like that’s something people don’t think about with events like that is just what goes into doing them.

Dan: That’s why that first check surprised me so much. It’s unique.

SBM: Seeing what you’ve been able to donate, though, is incredible. That has to be huge for those two charities.

Dan: It is. We’re at about $4.5 million that we’ve given. That’s something for our volunteers and sponsors to be proud of. Our sponsors are truly sponsor partners. You don’t just show up and things happen. They set up tents, they attend a lot of events. We have a lot of loyal, hardworking sponsors. And the city, too. We work really well with the city.

SBM: So for those first couple of years, what were those like for you?

Dan: I learned a lot, trying to understand the event, doing my best to really make sure that the efforts of the volunteers turned into financial donations. That’s really what my role is because we have amazing volunteers. We have racers that come in. We have sponsors – we still have sponsors from the beginning. We had all of those things, but turning those into real dollars for the charities is one of the keys.

Five years in a row, we’ve set a record and nine out of the last eleven have been records. We’re feeling very good that it’ll be six in a row and ten of twelve.

Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix
web-Social-Soles--Dan-DelBianco-3
Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix

SBM: That’s incredible! I’m curious about the racers, too. How does all of that work?

Dan: It’s really interesting. There are about two dozen vintage race organizations in the whole country. It’s a regional sport because you need to be able to get to the race Friday and come back Sunday to go to work. These aren’t professionals, they’re amateurs. They pay to race. The other reason to keep them regional is because you want to know each other. You’ll be racing in group five with the same people half a dozen times a year.

We are our own event, so we welcome entries from any of those race organizations to come here to Pittsburgh to race.

They pay a race entry, they travel here, they maintain their cars, they spend a tremendous amount of money on fuel and tires. Their fuel is not what you buy at the gas station. It’s higher octane and depending on the time of year, it can be $8 to $10 a gallon.

SBM: Oh wow.

Dan: They burn through it. We have a truck come in to help supply the fuel because they go through so much of it. What the racers give is a lot to put on the show for us. They’re putting on a show for 200,000 people in the park on the weekend.

SBM: It’s a unique show, too, because this is the only race like this on city streets.

Dan: Right. The others are all on race tracks, so they open the gate, roll in, and it’s a little bit easier.

SBM: I feel like that adds that much more.

Dan-DelBiancoDan: It’s really unique. We paddock them up on Prospect Drive under the giant oaks in Schenley Park and for them, it’s really different. It’s kind of a bucket list item for most racers.

SBM: That’s really cool.

Dan: There are a lot of racers who wish they could race here, but their cars and too big and too fast. We limit the engine sizes and speeds here at Schenley as a safety protocol.

SBM: Jumping back a little bit, how many races have your shoes seen with you? I’m sure they have a lot of stories to tell. What would they say if they could talk?

Dan: They’re a couple of years old. What I remember most was about three years ago. It was soaking wet and I was on my way to Schenley Park on Wednesday and that’s the day I’m out there with just a couple of people marking the tents and preparing for the tents to come in. I knew I was going to get soaked, so I stopped and bought the shoes and waterproof spray and did it all right there. I didn’t take them off for a week.

They’d talk about a lot of running around, arranging the logistics of it all. There’s nothing glamorous about them.

The race side…I don’t race a car, but some day. Someday I’d love to have a race car to go along with my race shoes.

SBM: I can imagine that in being around that so much, you probably want to get out there and play!

Dan: I do. I really do. But I’m lucky – I get to ride in a lot of the cars. We do the lunch time laps at Schenley and you get to be a passenger as the racer takes it across the course. The thrill of driving it is great, but you get a better experience as a passenger with a certified driver. They’re gonna do things that you never thought possible. That was one of the more interesting things.

I didn’t know anything about vintage racing. As I met the drivers, I was wholly impressed with what good folks they are. It’s friendly competition. They give each other parts, they fix each other’s cars. It’s gentleman racing. They’re not going bumper to bumper. There’s not supposed to be any contact in vintage racing. These cars are expensive and there’s no insurance. There’s no insurance that you can get anywhere that will cover you on a racetrack. Everyone’s really careful about it.

SBM: That’s cool, though. It’s not as much as a run you off the road as much as it’s a skill thing.

Dan: And it’s a show. They’re out there for the enjoyment. We like the idea that these cars are vintage cars, they’re beautiful cars, they’re works of art. The fact that these racers will bring them out and race them at high speeds for everyone’s entertainment is unique.

SBM: We kind of talked about the idea of wheels as shoes. When we’re talking about wheels, what comes to your mind?

Dan: The wheels on a wheelchair because many of the residents at Allegheny Valley School are bound to wheelchairs. It’s really severe developmental disabilities at AVS. We have an ambassador from both of the charities that we bring out to our event and that’s our way of conveying the message to the general public to not forget this is a charity event.

It gets lost in that. The challenge of trying to tell people what’s happening over the course of 10 days, you can get caught up in that and forget. The amount that we give, it’s a significant amount of money. We take enough to keep us going into the next year and give back to the charities. It’s all about that check presentation.

SBM: That is really, really cool that you have the ambassadors and keep that in the forefront.

Dan: We have the ambassadors there when we unveil the check, too, it’s a really important part for us. It’s not just sliding a check across the table. It’s really something meaningful and it gives all our volunteers the ability to interact with those who benefit from it.

We started with two ambassadors and we expanded it to where we now have eleven ambassadors. The originals were Brandon and Anita. We did a photoshoot with different residents and then we kept them on the team and now we have a team of ambassadors. Now Anita’s been with us for eleven years and Brandon for ten. We’re very proud of them.

SBM: It’s so great that you actually get a face as opposed to “here are the names.”

Dan: Many faces! When we gave the check last year at the auto show, it was a $400,000 check. (He shows us a photo.) Some of these folks work at AVS, our volunteers are there, even the guy from Schenley Park Golf Course. It really warms my heart and I get emotional all the time.

SBM: I don’t know how you couldn’t.

Dan: Seeing all the smiles… (He points to the photos.) This guy works in the club house, she works with the city, he does our social media. They spend so many hours on this. These people are the caregivers from AVS. That’s why we love having everyone at the check presentation because they get to be a part of it.

That night is also a fundraiser – part of which goes into that check – and it allows us to give the check in front of a couple of thousand people instead of maybe a hundred.

Think of all the events that are for charity. You don’t really know where the money goes – research, administration – and we work closely with these charities and we see the results of these funds. We see the people that it helps.

SBM: If you could walk in someone else’s shoes, whose would they be?

Dan: It would be the shoes of the charities. The first seven years that I was here, they gave me an office at Allegheny Valley School out in Coraopolis where the headquarters are. I had a cubicle – and we all have our tensions and frustrations at work – so if I found myself getting a little too uptight or too frustrated, I’d take a walk across the campus to where you’d see residents – most of them in wheelchairs.

I’d have lunch in the canteen where the residents who were able to would cook and serve the meals. It was one of those things that brings you right back down. Your problems of trying to find a sponsor that you were quite worried about that morning just…it’s puts it in perspective.

The people who don’t get enough attention are the providers, the people who work at Allegheny Valley School. Understand what it is to take care of someone. It’s hard work. It’s a job I could never do. They’ve got hearts that are so full, it’s incredible.

SBM: You really have to have a gift.

Dan: You really do. You’re not doing it for the money, you’re doing it out of love. Those are really special people.


You can find out more about the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix by visiting their website as well as their social media: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Flickr, LinkedIn, Google +, and Pinterest.
You can also learn more about the Autism Society of Pittsburgh and Allegheny Valley School on their websites.

Social History Calendar (This Day in History)


Check out the Social History Calendar Here!


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Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix Grand Prix Kick Off Rallye
Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix Grand Prix Kick Off Rallye

Have you been Seen?

Check out our Photo Vault for more photos:

43rd Annual Westmoreland Arts and Heritage Festival
43rd Annual Westmoreland Arts and Heritage Festival

Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix Grand Prix Kick Off Rallye
Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix Grand Prix Kick Off Rallye

EQT Flashes of Freedom Celebrate America Pittsburgh
EQT Flashes of Freedom Celebrate America Pgh

2017 Point Breeze Porch Crawl
2017 Point Breeze Porch Crawl

The Lantern Fest
The Lantern Fest

Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix Walnut Street Invitational Car Show
Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix Walnut Street Invitational Car Show

2017 Deutschtown Music Festival
2017
Deutschtown
Music Festival

Ligonier Dinner in White 2017
Ligonier Dinner in White 2017

Fashion at the Foyer
Fashion
at the Foyer

Fierce! International Queer Burlesque Festival Pittsburgh 2017
Fierce! International Queer Burlesque Festival Pittsburgh 2017

Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium Summer Safari - Colors of the Jungle
Pittsburgh Zoo
& PPG Aquarium
Summer Safari

Glam & Beauty Spa Expo
Glam &
Beauty
Spa Expo

Opens Streets
Opens
Streets

Fierce The Runway 17
Fierce The
Runway 17

PicklesBURGH
PicklesBURGH


Gregg Perelman

We love Pittsburgh and all it has to offer – so when it came to highlighting Social Spaces, we knew we had to talk to Gregg Perelman, CEO & founding partner of Walnut Capital in Shadyside (also home to the Social Butterfly Cocoon).

The Walnut Capital office, looking out over Walnut Street, is vibrant and comfortable - and right where the action is - just like Walnut’s properties at Bakery Living Orange & Bakery Living Blue across from Bakery Square - and everywhere else Walnut Capital handles properties: in Shadyside, Squirrel Hill, Uptown, South Side, North Side, Lawrenceville and more,… And Gregg is involved every step of the way.


Gregg PerelmanSocial Butterfly Magazine
: Walnut Capital has some awesome spaces. Which one is your favorite?

Gregg Perelman: I’m mostly familiar with what we’ve done at Bakery Square. It’s a 20-acre development where we’ve done some things over the last 10 years like repurposing old factories, turning them into buildings where we have thousands of workers every day come and work. Now part of the whole environment we’ve created places for people to live with Bakery Living. We sort of developed a new neighborhood at Bakery where we have essentially a submarket of the city where we’ve attracted talent due to the universities – Carnegie Mellon, Pitt, Chatham and the like. It filled a real niche and void that was in the market. It gave people an opportunity to come back and live in the city.

SBM
: It is a very, very cool space. I love walking around over there and seeing what’s there.

Gregg: (He nods.) When we did Bakery II, we were able to build this really cool, iconic bridge that crosses Penn Avenue. The most pride for me is at night when the whole thing’s lit up, driving down Penn Avenue and looking at it. I think it’s a really cool statement that we’ve done. We’re really proud of that.

SBM
: The lights in there look amazing.

Gregg: It’s been really amazing.

SBM
: It’s nice because there’s really something for everyone there. It’s very holistic.

Gregg: That’s what we tried for. Part of the 20-acres is rental properties which are great, there’s the office environment with some very cool retail – things that are unique, whether it’s West Elm or Anthropologie, things like that. We recently embarked on building 52 townhomes for sale. That’s been very successful. There’s been a big build up of demand for townhome living in the city.

SBM
: That’s exciting.

Gregg: Yeah, it really is. We’re looking to build another office building as well so we’re looking for other tenants. We think there’s a lot more opportunity we can do.

Mercurio's
Social Spaces
Cafe Moulin
Social Spaces
Marios East Side Saloon

SBM: You’re talking about new offices and townhouses, what are the areas in Pittsburgh you see as being up and coming or what’s next for the city?

Gregg: Bakery kind of straddles East Liberty, Larmier, and Shadyside so it’s a combination of three unique, distinct neighborhoods that kind of fuse together. People want to live in the city and the benefit of Pittsburgh is that you can do a lot of walking close by and you have strong retail. We have Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s, Giant Eagle. You have good transportation close by, you have great parks. People want to live in neighborhoods like that. Whether it’s Highland Park which is neighboring, whether it’s Lawrenceville which is kind of upcoming. It’s been around, but there’s a lot of development going on in Lawrenceville.

SBM
: That’s probably one of my favorites – I love the coffee shops and things over there. We’re excited about Fashion Week Downtown and the spaces there, too – last year with the Union Trust Building and this year with the Wintergarden and CAPA. For you, what’s one of your favorite areas in the city to hang out in or be around?

Gregg: Obviously Walnut Street! (He laughs.) It’s sort of our roots – we own several buildings on the street, we’re invested here. We sort of feel like this is our home base. That’s our favorite.

Social SpacesSBM
: It’s a cool space. You do a lot of traveling, too. What are some of your favorite spaces outside of Pittsburgh?

Gregg: We as a family, we do like to travel. We’ve done Africa, we did a Galapagos trip, Norway and that whole track, Croatia. We’ve travelled through the ‘normal’ Europe track – Germany, places like that. We love them.

SBM
: Do you draw inspiration from the places you visit?

Gregg: Definitely. Norway is very progressive and the way they do housing and architecture is very interesting. You try to take inspiration and emulate what you see and bring it back to Pittsburgh. You try to learn everywhere you go.▪


For more information about Walnut Capital, see their Website and follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest!


socialsoles_headingInterviewed by Kiley Fischer
with Introduction by Faith Bennett

August Social Soles Interview

The Social Soles interview series is based on the saying, “You don’t really know someone until you have walked in his shoes.” We thought it would be interesting to begin each interview asking our guest to bring a pair of shoes that are significant to him. They can be the pair he walked in each day in New York City; The ones he wore the day he first stepped foot in Pittsburgh; The shoes he wore as he discovered some of the city’s secrets; The pair he wore when the Pittsburgh Downtown Community Development Corporation opened its doors; The ones he was wearing as projects unfolded; A pair we would have never guessed...What shoes will he bring?

We associate shoes with memories: good and bad. The question steers the path of the conversation. This route will show us a side usually not seen in the one we are talking with. A more personal side. We are excited to see in which direction we are lead – by the choice in footwear and the memories stirred. Come. Let’s take a transformative walk…

In August, it’s all about Social Spaces: new dorms, new apartments, new homes, or maybe just a change. With people coming and going, we wanted to talk to someone deeply connected with the spaces in downtown Pittsburgh and we found that in Pittsburgh Downtown Community Development Corporation Executive Director John Valentine. John has put in a lot of time watching downtown evolve and it’s not just the city he’s seen the change in, but himself as well.


Social Butterfly Magazine
: Let’s dig in – tell me about the shoes you brought today.

John Valentine: I wore these shoes because most of my life, I was in business. I had my own businesses and it was always in the pursuit of money. You get to a point where you realize that’s not what truly makes you happy.

John Valentine - PDCDCWhen I bought these shoes, these were a more casual, different John. It was a transformation where – don’t get me wrong, I still think money’s important for different reasons in today’s society for things like healthcare – but I feel happier giving back. That’s part of what we do here at the PDCDC. We give back. I think these shoes actually could be a symbol of the time in my life when I had that transformation.

SBM: What sparked that for you?

John: I’ve been in the restaurant business most of my life and part of what I did was always give back to the community.

I lived in New York – I lived on 83rd and Broadway – and I loved urban living. I’m not a suburbanite in the least. I loved living in New York, but coming here was different because I felt like I could make a difference. I have this 13-year now love affair with downtown Pittsburgh. For me, it started with volunteering with the old downtown neighborhood association and being part of a group that founded this organization.

It doesn’t feel like I’m doing anything, it just feels like a part of me. I don’t know if the transformation started when I moved here because I always loved urban, but the transformation in giving back and creating started when I moved here and I love it. I feel like I’m a different person.

SBM: That’s kind of something we hear a lot, the way Pittsburgh is kind of this different animal in terms of cities.

John: I think Pittsburgh’s great. I always say this: you have people say, “Well New York’s a great city.” It is. It’s unique, it’s unbelievable, it’s gigantic. But, what actually makes a city great? I think in Pittsburgh, it’s the people. That’s the stakeholders, everybody. Everyone seems to work together, everyone seems to care.

There’s a pride here that I haven’t seen. I’ve lived in three cities – Philadelphia, New York, and Pittsburgh – and I think what separates Pittsburgh from everywhere is the people. People who care, people who are just great, they’re good to work with. I think it’s a great city.

SBM: What was the goal that the PDCDC was founded on and what is the work that you do, for those who aren’t familiar with the organization?

John: The goal was to create a great downtown and make an 18-hour city. Before there was a PDCDC, the only people who were really creating were the Cultural Trust. The Cultural Trust is great. They don’t get the credit they deserve and they were the true pioneers.

I thought there were a lot of things lacking – not from the Trust – but from other organizations we thought could fill the void. We wanted to create and 18-hour city.

SBM: What are the kind of things you’re still doing now?

John Valentine - PDCDCJohn: We brought in a grocery store – downtown residents were begging for a grocery store. Just last week we opened up an off-leash dog run park.

One of our comprehensive projects is the 15-Minute Project. The 15-Minute Project gets its name because we want residents to walk or bike 15 minutes to get everything they need. This is a long-term plan that has three phases: conception, respite, and implementation. Conception is obviously where you conceptualize. Respite is where you gather together and move forward with phase three, implementation.

There’s so many things we’re doing. There’s book clubs, dining clubs, writers groups, Third Tuesday Happy Hour. Fashion Week, of course. The Italian Festival. We’re going to do a restaurant week strictly downtown. There’s so many things. I think there’s 24 different programs. These are all amenities that not only residents but downtown business people wanted. We feel like we’re a group that’s filling that need.

SBM: What is one thing you hope most that people get from what’s happening here?

John: I think people look at downtown Pittsburgh right now and say it’s great. Whether it’s great or not depends on where you set the bar. I think we’ve come a really long way and done some great things, but I always tell people, “You haven’t seen anything yet.” If they can get anything from downtown Pittsburgh: compared to where we were, it’s great; compared to where we’re going, it’s going to be even greater?

SBM: What’s one thing you’re most excited about moving forward?

John: That’s a great question and it depends upon where you’re asking on the scale. Before I would’ve said the grocery store, now I’d say the dog park. I think when you look at downtown Pittsburgh, we need to find more stock for residents and I think there’s a demand. I also think the day’s gonna come, and it may be five years before it’s established, where we have a retail and fashion district. I think that’s the hole in the donut right now. That would make us more vibrant. Could you picture Smithfield or Wood being open-air cafes and boutiques? That’s the vision.

SBM: That sounds awesome. That is really cool. I know we’re talking about social spaces for August. What kind of spaces are there in downtown that people maybe don’t know are there?

John Valentine - PDCDC
John Valentine - PDCDC
John Valentine - PDCDC

John: That’s a really good question. Anything?

SBM: Anything. Those little hidden gems that even people who live here might not know about.

John: I think the Winter Garden is a beautiful space – it’s all glass. It’s absolutely beautiful. You know what I’m talking about. Definitely the Winter Garden.

SBM: We are excited that PGH Fashion Week Downtown 21+ will be held there this year. We're also super excited for the Fashion Finale at CAPA: The Junior Runway Show. Downtown is pumping! Any other Downtowner secrets?

John: Absolutely, I’ll tell you what’s cool and a lot of people don’t know this. I live in Gateway Towers and there’s underground routes you can take that people don’t know about. They don’t all connect, so you might have to do underground and then pop up, but when the weather’s bad and I have to go to Grant Street, I can take two different underground routes that prevent me from getting soaking wet. That’s cool.

SBM: That is really cool. I mean, I’ll jump the T, but I never knew there were actual foot routes.

John Valentine - PDCDCJohn: They’re there. When Macy’s was open, you could take an underground route to the garage, come up through Macys, cross the second floor bridge, go into the other parking lot, and go into Oxford Center. Macy’s closing messed me up, but there are others. They’re cool.

SBM: I love stuff like that.

John: I can cross the street, go into Fifth Avenue Place, take the bridge across Penn Avenue, take the bridge across Stanwix, go down and take the tunnel to Gateway and the only time I’m out is when I cross Liberty Avenue. It’s really cool. It’s awesome.

I moved here in January and the first week I was in Pittsburgh, a friend of mine went to dinner, and 2004 it was like 1-degree. It was freezing. The wind chill was much worse. I walked out and went to dinner and walked back. I said to the door person, I’m frozen. He said, “Well where’d you go?” I said, “I went to this restaurant” and he said, “You know, you could’ve gone the underground route.” He told me all about it.

SBM: That is seriously really cool and now I want to find the routes. You talking about moving here, what prompted that? Obviously New York to here is a huge difference, why Pittsburgh?

John: I was in the restaurant business and there was a group that thought they were going to redo Fifth and Forbes. They wanted our group to do a restaurant here. I decided to be the resident who came here. Winded up they didn’t get the contract and I said, “I’m going to stay here for a couple of months and enjoy,” and 13 years later here I am.

SBM: It’s so crazy to see how that migration happens from one place to another to another.

John: I kind of feel that in New York, you can make a difference, but it’s a lot more difficult. Here, everything just lined up for me. I looked at downtown Pittsburgh and when I moved here, everyone migrated out in the evening. It was empty. I thought, “This is Philadelphia a few years back, this is New York a few years back.” It’s almost like you had this time machine. I had this vision of what Pittsburgh could be and we’re still on the journey, but it’s been a great journey so far.

I tell people, we’re not at the end, we’re at the end of the beginning. Sometimes I’ll be a little negative and tell you Pittsburghers don’t see it. Because I’ve lived in other places, sometimes I think the transplants see it more than the natives.

SBM: I feel like you gain an appreciation because I know I’ve popped out of Pittsburgh a couple of times, but I always come back. There’s nothing like this place.

John: I think that’s fantastic. I even tell my staff: travel. See things. You’ll come back so much more well-rounded. See other things in the world, see what other cities are doing. You might fall in love with another city, or you may come back and appreciate Pittsburgh more than you already do.

John Valentine - PDCDCSBM: That’s what happened with me.

John: And you’ve learned a lot, I bet.

SBM: Definitely. Speaking of traveling, if we travel back to the shoes for a minute, if your shoes could talk, what stories would they tell? What would they say?

John: I think the story they would tell is that they’re on happy feet. I’ve learned to appreciate. I’m a people person, that’s my art. Money matters, but it’s not as much of an emphasis. I’m really enjoying people now. I think my shoes would say, “There’s a lot of happiness and satisfaction doing for others. A lot.”

You can have a lot of money and something’s still missing. These shoes will say, “I think John filled that void.”

SBM: I really like that. Whose shoes would you walk in if you could walk in anyone’s and experience what they’ve experienced?

John: My father’s. I think the easy answers would be Jesus, Martin Luther King, Ghandi, when you see how much they gave to the world. But my father was a great man. I was lucky to have him as a mentor, someone who loved me, who cared for me. He would use all these clichés and he used that to teach me. It was a great way to teach. His influence on me has made me the person I am.

If I had to choose one person, it would be my dad. If I had to choose the people I mentioned, I think most people would like to walk in their shoes, but for me personally, it would be my dad. I miss him.

SBM: There’s something about that bond, being able to see where they were coming from and what they were able to teach.

John: I agree. I always say I was blessed.


For more information about the PDCDC and their programs and offerings, check out their website as well as Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, and LinkedIn.


Social Influencer

What do you get when you add PGH to HGTV?!?!?! A new Flip Show!!! We hope you checked out the PREMIERE of Steel City Rehab on HGTV! Where did YOU watch? Let us know!

Kris & Tara own K Bennett Development Group and Lifespace Pittsburgh here in Pittsburgh and started flipping houses in 2009. HGTV found them on Instagram (@kbennettgroup & @lifespacepittsburgh), loved them, their work, AND our city!!

We got to spend some time with Kris and Tara, see a few of their Social Spaces, and get to know them a little better! Stay tuned here for more of the group! In the meantime: Check out our Monday Montage and Behind the Scene at Social Butterfly Magazine on our YouTube Channel to see more Social Spaces with K Bennet Group!

Steel City Rehab

Steel City Rehab

What do you get when you add PGH to HGTV?!?!

In case you haven’t heard (and we can’t imagine that is even possible, but…) HGTV aired a pilot episode of Steel City Rehab recently.  The show followed Kris and Tara Bennett, husband and wife owners of Pittsburgh based K Bennett Development Group and Lifespace Pittsburgh as they contemplated restoring and renovating one of three featured properties around the city.  They settled on a home in Friendship for the project, and the end result was pretty amazing!  We got the chance to meet them on site of two of their in-process projects, snap some shots, and ask a few questions.  These two, Yinz!.... 😍

K Bennett Development GroupLifespace Pittsburgh

Steel City RehabSocial Butterfly Magazine: So, we’ve heard a bit about how your retirement from a completely unrelated field led you to flipping houses…  You needed to plan for the next phase of your life, providing for your family. You knew some guys who were flipping, seemed like a good place to start….  You want to fill in the blanks – How did you know where to start, what to do, who to call?

K Bennett Development Group: The funny thing is that we really didn't know where to start.  Haha.  I think one of the main qualities that I brought over from my previous career in BMX was the ability to dive right in and see what happens.  Obviously, we knew that we needed to buy a house, but that was about the extent of our knowledge.  We did a lot of research and studying, but we had no real world experience with construction or real estate.

SBM: Did everything take off from there or did you pause and think “WHAT am I doing?”  What was the biggest shocker/realization for you (negative) – something you didn’t expect going in?

KBennett: There were definitely some "what have we gotten ourselves into?!" moments.  I think the biggest shocker is how long everything takes, and how many problems you actually run into.  You watch the TV shows, and they narrow it down to a half hour episode with one or two hiccups and then post the huge profits in bold writing at the end.  This stuff is really, really hard.  Sure, the profits are great, but there's so much more that goes in to every little detail than most people realize.

SBM: Do you think that Flipping is easier in Pittsburgh than other areas or harder?  (Codes not as strict, not as many landmarked here as opposed to other places (allowing more freedom to remodel), more inventory, better purchase prices, city on an upswing…)

KBennett: Obviously, the city being on an upswing really helps things out.  However, we're doing "value-add" rehabs as opposed to just buying and flipping based on short-term appreciation.  Obviously, appreciation helps the cause, but we're making our profits off of the value that we're adding to these houses.  As far as zoning and inspections go, it's definitely much more strict in the city than it is out in the suburbs.  That can affect your timelines and drag things out a bit, but we're building a brand and doing things the right way, so we're happy to comply.  I think people in this business unfortunately have a bad reputation overall, so I don't mind that the stricter codes are there to weed out the people that aren't doing things the right way.

Steel City Rehab
Steel City Rehab
Steel City Rehab
Steel City Rehab
Steel City Rehab
Steel City Rehab

Steel City RehabSBM: What are the advantages/disadvantages to working with your spouse?

KBennett: I suppose the disadvantage would be that we almost always end up talking about work.  However, we're both very passionate about what we do and really enjoy talking shop, so that's not all that big of a deal.  It can just be difficult sometimes to let it all go and not talk too serious.  That being said, the advantages very much out weigh any disadvantages.  Tara and I are probably closer than any two people I know, and we really enjoy that our career allows us to spend time together.  From being spouses to parents to business partners, we've learned and grown so much together.  I think we make a great team, and it's awesome to have someone to share all of that with that you're so close to.

SBM: What makes Pittsburgh special?

KBennett: I've always loved that Pittsburgh feels like a really big small town.  Each neighborhood really has its own feel and character that really sets it apart from all of the others.  There is so much inventory that can be renovated so Pittsburgh can grow from the inside out.  The infrastructure is in place, and it's awesome to bring old neighborhoods back to life as opposed to growing outward with strip malls and sub-divisions like so many other cities have to do.

Steel City Rehab
Steel City Rehab
Steel City Rehab
Steel City Rehab
Steel City Rehab
Steel City Rehab

Steel City RehabSBM: I have always wanted to repurpose an old church.  I’ve even toured one for sale (complete with a Pipe Organ – WHAT would I do with THAT?!?!) ANYway…  Is there a project you have on some list somewhere that you would LOVE to do?

KBennett: A church would be awesome!  I think our dream project would likely be along those same lines.  Some kind of extensive re-purpose project where we can really incorporate a lot of what's already there.  We're doing that on a small scale with our Cargo Loft project, but it would be awesome to re-purpose an entire warehouse, church, old bank, etc.

SBM:  What neighborhoods should we be watching?

KBennett: I'm currently really high on the 28 corridor.  Troy Hill, Millvale, Etna, Sharpsburg...  28 flows so much better than it used to, so the access to the city is great.  Not to mention that you're a short jump over a bridge away from all of the perks of the East End neighborhoods.  I think those are all great neighborhoods where you can really enjoy the perks of a Lawrencville or Strip District without having to pay the prices to actually live there.

Steel City Rehab
Steel City Rehab
Steel City Rehab
Steel City Rehab
Steel City Rehab

SBM: So, what do we get when we add PGH to HGTV?  What’s up with Steel City Rehab?

KBennett: Hopefully very soon!  We're starting to learn that things in the TV world happen very slowly.  We're basically in a holding pattern to see whether or not we get picked up for a full season.  The response was amazing both locally and nationally, and we had really great ratings, so hopefully that was enough for HGTV to pull the trigger and order a full season.  Fingers crossed! ◼


For more information on K Bennett Development Group see their Website and check them out on Facebook and Instagram!


Social Sisters

Scarlett O'Hara, by Jeremy Raymer
Scarlett O'Hara, by Jeremy Raymer

Kid Contributor Social Spaces

Our Kid Contributors, the Social Sisters, get to update their bedrooms before the new school year! They got these commissioned pieces this last Christmas as gifts. Both pieces were painted by Pittsburgh Artist & Muralist, Jeremy Raymer. Stay tuned to see how their paintings fit into the plans!

Check our Social Media for snaps, insta stories, and live streams of the process and then check back here for the full story!

Bird Girl, by Jeremy Raymer
Savannah Bird Girl, by Jeremy Raymer

Social Media

Fave Posts:


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SBM Patriotic Merch for #Macaroni Day
SBM Patriotic Merch for #Macaroni Day

#AllAmericanPetPhotoDay
#AllAmericanPetPhotoDay

Roll the Rack has gone Disney (with Play Story)!
Roll the Rack has gone Disney (with Play Story)!

The Social Sisters celebrating #NationalIceCreamDay
The Social Sisters celebrating #NationalIceCreamDay

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#NationalJunkFoodDay

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#TequilaDay


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1. Social Fur Sister Marsha Mellow checking out the ice cream truck on #NationalIceCreamDay 2. The Social Sisters celebrate #NationalIceCreamDay by making homemade ice cream pies, check out the filter fun!

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(Full Length videos of special occasions like
Social Butterfly Magazine Fashion Week Downtown) and more additions in 2017!


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Special Announcement : Junior Runway Fashion Finale
Special Announcement : Junior Runway Fashion Finale

Cookie Couture Model Search
Cookie Couture Model Search

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#SimplicityDay

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* Always a Contest * Always a Giveaway

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and Follow us on Social Media for extra chances to win and so you don’t miss current and new contests coming up!

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Click Here for upcoming Contests & Official Contest Rules

#ComplimentYourMirrorDay
#ComplimentYourMirrorDay

Congratulations to our winner:

Lori Sexton Leal

On July 3, 2017 we gave away 1 $25 Panera gift card!


Teddy Bear Picnic
#TeddyBearPicnic

Congratulations to our winner:

Janet Adams on Facebook

On July 10, 2017 we gave away 1 $15 ColdStone gift card!


World Emoji Day
#WorldEmojiDay

Congratulations to our winner:

Harry Bechtol on Facebook

On July 17, 2017 we gave away 1 $15 Subway gift card!

Pop-up Contest
Pop-up Contest

Congratulations to our winner:

Dylan Strayer

On July 17, 2017 we gave away  2 tickets to the Fierce International Queer Burlesque Festival 2017!


 

Tequila Day
#TequilaDay

Congratulations to our winner:

Tera Culverwell

On July 24, 2017 we gave away  1 $25 Petco gift card!


#MuttsDay
#MuttsDay

Congratulations to our winner:

Marilyn Wall on Twitter

On July 31, 2017 we gave away  1 $15 Starbucks gift card!


social-expectations-heading

September

The Fashion Issue

Social Seen
  • EQT Three Rivers Regatta
  • Pittsburgh Little Italy Days
  • And More...
Social Soles
  • Kiya Tomlin
    Owner & Designer, Uptown Sweats
Social Calendar
  • Social Butterfly Magazine Junior Runway Fashion Show
  • Thrival Innovation & Music Festival
  • Pittsburgh Irish Festival
  • Steel City Big Pour
  • And More...
Social Butterfly: Fun, Fashion & Food
  • SBM September Merch Fashion Week Edition +
Social Animal
  • Macy’s Elephant Day

October

October Expectations

Social Seen
  • Social Butterfly Magazine Junior Runway Fashion Show
  • Britsburgh 2017
  • Pittsburgh Pierogi Festival
  • And More...
Social Soles
  • Gene Ogrodnik
    President, Pittsburgh Institute of Mortuary Science
Social Calendar
  • ZooBoo
  • Phantom Fright Nights
  • Delmont Apple ‘n Arts Festival
  • ScareHouse
  • Halloween
  • And More...
Social Butterfly: Fun, Fashion & Food
  • SBM October Merch Halloween Edition +
Social Animal
  • Animal Themed Fun!

November

November Expectations

Social Seen
  • Fort Ligonier Days
  • Undressed: A History of Underwear
  • And More...
Social Soles
  • Derek Stevens
    Owner & Chef, Union Standard
Social Calendar
  • WPXI Holiday Parade
  • Light Up Night
  • Thanksgiving
  • People’s Gas Holiday Market
  • And More...
Social Butterfly: Fun, Fashion & Food
  • SBM November Merch Thankful Edition +
Social Animal
  • Animal Themed Fun!
Social Psychology
  • By Faith Bennett, Licensed Psychotherapist
Contests

Check out our Website and Social Media daily. We announce most contests for new chances to win and winners of previous contests on Mondays. We announce “Pop Up Contests” too, so don’t miss out! Social With us Daily!

And Much More...